EHP FYI

Newsletter from Employee Health Promotions

September 2020

Go to National Alliance on Mental Illness for more information
Jelly Roll - Save Me (New Unreleased Video)

September Suicide Prevention Month

Suicidal thoughts, much like mental health conditions, can affect anyone regardless of age, gender or background. In fact, suicide is often the result of an untreated mental health condition. Suicidal thoughts, although common, should not be considered normal and often indicate more serious issues.


Every year thousands of individuals die by suicide, leaving behind their friends and family members to navigate the tragedy of loss. In many cases, friends and families affected by a suicide loss (often called “suicide loss survivors”) are left in the dark. Too often the feelings of shame and stigma prevent them from talking openly.


September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month—a time to share resources and stories in an effort to shed light on this highly taboo and stigmatized topic. We use this month to reach out to those affected by suicide, raise awareness and connect individuals with suicidal ideation to treatment services. It is also important to ensure that individuals, friends and families have access to the resources they need to discuss suicide prevention.


Informational Resources


Crisis Resources

  • If you or someone you know is in an emergency, call 911 immediately.

  • If you are in crisis or are experiencing difficult or suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Hotline at 1-800-273 TALK (8255)

  • If you’re uncomfortable talking on the phone, you can also text NAMI to 741-741 to be connected to a free, trained crisis counselor on the Crisis Text Line.


Awareness Resources

Help promote awareness by sharing images and graphics on your social media accounts. Use #SuicidePrevention or #StigmaFree.


While suicide prevention is important to address year-round, Suicide Prevention Awareness Month provides a dedicated time to come together with collective passion and strength around a difficult topic. The truth is, we can all benefit from honest conversations about mental health conditions and suicide, because just one conversation can change a life.

Created by National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI)

Mood Candy app from Dr Amit Sood

Additional Resource from Dr. Amit Sood - Welcome Week Presenter

Those of you who listened to Dr. Sood's presentation during welcome week, know that he has great advice for wellness. He also has over forty years of practice in meditation and is internationally known for his work on resilience, mindfulness, stress management, happiness, and well-being.

Dr. Sood has created an app in partnership with Apple, Mood Candy. It offers a buffet of uplifting, on-demand quotes, stories, and meditations to decrease stress and develop a resilient mindset during these difficult times, all in candy-sized bites. The app strives to help reduce stress and enhance resilience and happiness. The entire content of the app is available free of cost to all users on Apple Store.

VITAL Worklife Employee Assistance Program

Vital Worklife Employee Assistance Program. This service was highlighted by Molly Fox and Christina Mattson in their presentation during Welcome Week. It is available to ALL EMPLOYEES and geared toward recognizing an employee's life situations and helping to find appropriate help. It is confidential and is available to both the employee and members of their household - at no cost to the employee.

Examples of services available:

  • Phone Coaching

  • Online Seminars

  • Chemical Dependency Assessment

  • Face to Face counseling

  • Legal and Financial discounts

  • Click HERE for a complete list of services offered by this provider.

Phone number is: 1-800-383-1908.

Website is: http://vitalworklife.com username-mankatoschools, password -member

Resources for You from MAPS can be Found Here

Products available to employees who are covered by a MAPS insurance plan
quote by Dr Amit Sood

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