MACBETH

SIGNIFICANT QUOTATIONS

ACT 1 SCENE 1

"Fair is foul, and foul is fair. Hover through the fog and the filthy air" (Act I scene I lines: 11-12)
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The meaning behind this quote

This quote plays a huge role throughout this entire play. Simply it means that appearances are often deceptive, and that things are different from what they appear to be. This reflects the theme that comes up very often during the play, in all of the characters, which is appearance verses reality.

Why we picked this quote

We picked this quote as explained before, it plays on of the biggest roles in the entire play, whether behind the scenes ( Lady Macbeth), as she shows weakness of on the side on the stage.Or plain in view ( The witches), the witches set a scene for confusion and illusion in the play. They successfully manage to mislead, cheat and incite evil throughout Scotland through ambiguous and misleading language towards Macbeth.

ACT 2 SCENE 2

" Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand?" (Act 2 Scene 2: lines 72-73)

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The Meaning Behind this Quote

This quote, spoken by Macbeth shows how guilty he feels after he cowardly murders king Duncan in his sleep. He uses an allusion saying that his hands will never be clean of the dead no matter how much he washes his hands. Even if he uses the water from Neptune’s oceans he will still be guilty. Although the blood was no longer on his hands, his guilt was never cleansed and he knows that.

Why we picked this Quote

We chose this quote because it was at this point as to when Macbeth’s life began to go downhill. This quote also shows an important theme within the story, which is appearance vs reality. Although Macbeth appears to be clean and had nothing to do with the murder because his hands are clean when in reality, Macbeth is the guilty one. Not only that, he also killed him cowardly making him much more guilty. This also led to him becoming mad as this guilt was never lifted and in fact Macbeth began to do more bad things until he had been killed.

ACT 3 SCENE 4

"There the grown serpent lies. The worm that's fled/Hath nature that in time will venom breed,/No teeth for the present." (Act 3 Scene 4 lines: 34-36)
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The meaning behind this quote

The quote includes animal imagery, which Shakespeare uses throughout the tragedy. Macbeth wanted Banquo and his son Fleance killed because the witches said Banquo will father a line of kings, who will eventually overpower Macbeth. Banquo represents the serpent that has been killed and Fleance represents the little worm that has fled the scene. Macbeth still sees Fleance as a threat but isn't too focused on him as he has no power yet as a child.

Why we picked this quote

We picked this quote because as stated before, it uses strong animal imagery. Snakes are symbols of danger. Macbeth compares Banquo and Fleance to a serpent and a baby snake because they are a danger to him as Fleance will eventually become King, as well as Banquo's future sons.

Act 4 Scene 1

"Macbeth! Macbeth! Macbeth! Beware Macduff. Beware the Thane of Fife. Dismiss me. Enough." (Act 4 Scene 1: lines 77-79)

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The Meaning Behind this Quote

This quote was part of the 3 Apparitions of the Witches to Macbeth. Desperate for information about the future, Macbeth visits the Witches. The first apparition seems to be a head with a helmet and the voice warns him about Macduff. Macbeth is delighted with their encouraging prophecies becomes too confident, leading to his downfall. Macbeth is overtaken by pride and power which led him to make poor decisions and be forced to lose his throne.

Why We Picked This Quote?

We picked this quote because it is an element of foreshadowing. The Witches' prophecies are all true but Macbeth does not try to interpret the real meaning of each apparition and caused his defeat. The appearance of the armed and disembodied head in the first apparition was soon to be Macbeth's, who was beheaded by Macduff. Macbeth could have used the prophecies to his advantage, but instead refused to act upon it.

Act 5 scene 1

"I tell you yet again, Banquo's buried. He cannot come out on his grave" (Act 5 scene 1: lines 55-56)
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The meaning behind this Quote

This quote is a vital part in Macbeth's downfall, and is the final key in Macbeth's collapse as a person, and as a king. As the play continues, Macbeth continues to breakdown, mentally, killing everyone that gets in his way, or interferes with his path to "kingdom". He continues to push away Lady Macbeth, as he gets stronger in his insanity , and as Lady Macbeth is pushed away, she becomes very visibly insane, as the guilt overwhelms her.

Why we picked this Quote

We picked this quote because it shows guilt. Lady Macbeth expresses her guilt as she is sleep walking and confesses that Banquo had been murdered by Macbeth. She is worried that her and Macbeth will get caught and pay for the consequences. This leads to Lady Macbeth's suicidal death.

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