Foodborne Illness

By: Admir Jahic

Salmonella

Cause: Contaminating food during food handling/processing and animal feces have salmonella so not washing your hands after animal care can also cause it.

Food Sources: Beef, Poultry, Milk, and Eggs are the main sources.

Symptoms: Diarrhea, Fever, and Abdominal Cramps.

Prevention: Wash hands before handling foods and always wash all knives/cutting awards before/during/after awards.

Duration: Lasts usually between 4 and 7 days.

Campylobacter

Cause: Contaminating food by handling food with campylobacter bacterium that is raw.

Food Sources: Chicken, Turkey, Milk, Water

Symptoms: Diarrhea, Stomach Pain, Cramps, and Fever.

Prevention: Wash utensils before/during/after use and wash when cutting different foods at different times.

Duration: Illness usually lasts a week.

E-Coli

Causes: Contamination and mishandling of foods. Comes from animal/human feces if hands are not washed after.

Food Sources: Undercooked Burgers, Vegetables washed in contaminated water, and Fruit Juice that isn't pasteurized.

Symptoms: Severe Stomach Cramps, Diarrhea, and Vomiting

Prevention: Careful regulation of fluids and essential minerals. Also

Duration: Usually lasts between 5-10 days.

Norovirus

Causes: Food/Drink that has been contaminated and raw/uncooked foods.

Food Sources: Can be in meats, vegetables, fruits, etc.

Symptoms: Vomiting, Diarrhea, Stomach Cramps, Chills, Headache, and Fatigue.

Prevention: Keep utensils clean at all times, wash hands to prevent contamination, and wash fruits and vegetables before use. Also, try to not eat out as much to prevent the chance of getting Norovirus.

Duration: Goes away within a few days.

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Clostridium Perfringens

Causes: Contamination from human/animal feces or if food is left and cooled before refrigerating.

Food Sources: Meats, Meat Products, and Gravy

Symptoms: Abdominal Cramps and Watery Diarrhea.

Prevention: Put foods automatically in the refrigerator, and prevent contamination by washing utensils and hands at all times.

Duration: Usually over with 24 hours.

Citations

"Salmonella Poisoning (Salmonellosis) Symptoms, Causes, Treatment."WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"Campylobacteriosis-Topic Overview." WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"E. Coli Infection From Food or Water-Treatment Overview." WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"E. Coli Directory: Find News, Features, and Pictures Related to E. Coli."WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"E. Coli." E. Coli. Nemours, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"Norovirus (Winter Vomiting Bug): Symptoms and Treatment." WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"Food Poisoning: Clostridium Perfringens-Topic Overview." WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

Philpott, Tom. "Good News on Salmonella Outbreak: CDC Is Back on the Job. Bad News: It's Antibiotic-resistant." Mother Jones. Mother Jones and the Foundation for National Progress, 9 Oct. 2013. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

Whitworth, Joe. "Salmonella Outbreak in Wales Sickens 22."FoodQualityNews.com. William Reed Business Media, 23 Aug. 2013. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology." Zoonotic Ecology and Epidemiology. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

Whitworth, Joe. "Genome Sequencing to Shed Light on Campylobacter Coli." FoodQualityNews.com. William Reed Business Media, 10 Oct. 2013. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

Nordqvist, Christian. "E. Coli Infections: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments." Medical News Today. MediLexicon International, 8 July 2015. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"E.coli (Escherichia Coli)." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 21 Dec. 2015. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"Infectious Disease." North Carolina Health News. North Carolina Health News, 3 Feb. 2012. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"Norovirus Often Epidemic in Winter Months with Severe Gastro Infections."Norovirus Often Epidemic in Winter Months with Severe Gastro Infections. Deb Group, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"Germs." Germs. N.p., 20 Apr. 2015. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

"Food Safety." Clostridium Perfringens «. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.