1920s Gangsters

By: Katelyn Brule, Blake Hearn, Carson Webb

- On February 14, 1929 seven men who were associated with the Irish gangster George "Bugs" Moran were shot to death by men dressed as policemen.
- In 1920, Capone had a multi-million dollar operation in Chicago. His operation involved bootlegging, prostitution and gambling.
- Edward "Eddie" J. Adams was a Kansas bootlegger, car thief, and murderer. He escaped custody twice and was killed in a shootout with police.
- With the repeal of the Prohibition in 1933, the mafia moved to new illegal underworld activities.
- In the late 1920s, a power struggle known as the Castellammarese War broke out in New York between the two biggest Italian-American gangs.
- Gangster Owen "The Killer" Madden was the owner of one of the most well known clubs in New York called "The Cotton Club".
- In the mid-20th century, there were 24 known families in America with an estimated 5,000 full-fledged members of gangs.
- The "Black" Sox scandal rocked the world of professional sports and sent a shockwave through the underworld and gangs.
- In the end, most of the gangsters were sent to jail, killed by rivals, or killed by law enforcement.
- When Prohibition ended, the Mafia moved into other criminal ventures, from illegal gambling, drug trafficking, and infiltrating labor unions and businesses.

Sources:

"Prohibition and Depression Era Gangsters and Outlaws." Prohibition and Depression Era Gangsters and Outlaws. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Jan. 2016.

"St. Valentine’s Day Massacre." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 08 Jan. 2016.