Asian Elephants

magnificent creatures

Asian Elephants

The Asian Elephant is a magnificent creature. It is a distant relative of the African Elephant (Loxodonta africana). The ears of the Asian Elephant are distinctively smaller than their cousin. The Elephants back is rounded so that the highest part of the animal is the crown of its head. This animal can be found in China, Asia and the Indian Subcontinent. These animals are extremely heavy and can weigh up to many tonnes. An average weight for male Asian elephants is about 5.4 tonnes, the average weight of a female is about 2.7 tonnes.


Elephants are extremely smart and they can live up to 70 years of age. Most of the females in herds are connected by family. The oldest female in the herd has a peculiar name, the "Matriarch" ( the head or leader female character). When a male is about seven or eight years of age they have usually reached sexual maturity and leave their natal group. When a male reaches the age of 20 he comes into a state called "musth", this is when males become extremely aroused by females. "Musth" lasts for about three weeks and during this span of time males will fight for the access of the cow. Females ( Cows) also only reach their sexual maturity at 10 years of age

Elephants eat a lot every day. Their diet mostly consists of different kinds of grasses, but also will eat barks and scrubs. These animals can eat up to an average of 150 kilometer of grass or vegetation; calves may eat their mothers dung for nutrients. Since elephants eat a lot of grasses they have up to 18 defecate problems (bowel problems).

Baby calf wandering around the forest

Did you know?

Only some male Asian elephants have tusks, the female have "tushes" instead.

Did you know?

Elephants have very thick, dry, greyish- brown colored skin.
Two parents walking with their newly born calf.

Biography/ Works Cited


Photographer and copyright holder: David Behrens

http://www.indonesianfauna.com/asiaticelephant.php

Video, tea time: unknown video taper

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/life/Asian_Elephant#p0048586

writing: unknown, picture: Scott Camazine

http://www.arkive.org/asian-elephant/elephas-maximus/