cornwall

History

The modern English name derived from the tribal name Cornovii, Cornovii is likely to mean people of the peninsula, Cornwall was the main source of Tin for the civilizations of the Mediterranean, When the Tin reserves ran out, they migrated to places like America.

Since the decline of mining, agriculture and fishing, the economy comes preferring tourism, thanks to its attractive coastline.

Culture

Culture of Cornwall is probably the most unique across England to be coming from the Celtic culture,Cornwall is considered to be one of the Six Nations Celtic, along with Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Britain and Isle of Man.The main exponent of the cornica culture is its language, coming from the Celtic languages, related to Welsh and breton, Literature is also important in the culture cornica, emphasizing the texts written in Cornish, and writers and poets born in County, William Golding, the poet John Betjeman, Silas Hocking, highlighting

flag

Saint Piran's Flag is regarded by many as the national flag of Cornwall and an emblem of the Cornish people; and by others as the county flag. The banner of Saint Piran is a white cross on a black background (in terms of heraldry 'sable, a cross argent'). Saint Piran is supposed to have adopted these two colours from seeing the white tin in the black coals and ashes during his supposed discovery of tin. Davies Gilbert in 1826 described it as anciently the flag of St Piran and the banner of Cornwall, and another history of 1880 said that: "The white cross of St. Piran was the ancient banner of the Cornish people." The Cornish flag is an exact reverse of the former Breton national flag and is known by the same name "Kroaz Du".

There are also claims that the patron saint of Cornwall is Saint Michael or Saint Petroc, but Saint Piran is by far the most popular of the three and his emblem is internationally recognised as the flag of Cornwall.

Demographics

Cornwall's population was 537,400 at the last census, with a population density of 144 people per square kilometre, ranking it 40th and 41st respectively among the 47 counties of England. Cornwall's population was 95.7% white brithitish and has a relatively high level of population growth. At 11.2% in the 1980s and 5.3% in the 1990s, it had the fifth-highest population growth rate of the English counties.The natural change has been a small population decline, and the population increase is due to inward migration into Cornwall. According to the 1991 census, the population was 469,800.

Cornwall has a relatively high retired population, with 22.9% of pensionable age, compared with 20.3% for the United Kingdom as a whole.This may be due to a combination of Cornwall's rural and coastal geography increasing its popularity as a retirement location, and outward migration of younger residents to more economically diverse areas.

Visual arts

Since the 19th century, Cornwall, with its unspoilt maritime scenery and strong light, has sustained a vibrant visual art scene of international renown. Artistic activity within Cornwall was initially centred on the art-colony of newlyn, most active at the turn of the 20th century. This Newlyn School is associated with the names ofStanhope Forbes, Elizabeth Forbes, Norman Garstin and Lamorna Birch.]Modernist writers such as D. H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf lived in Cornwall between the wars,and Ben Nicholson, the painter, having visited in the 1920s came to live in St Ives with his then wife, the sculptor Barbara Hepworth, at the outbreak of the second world war. They were later joined by the Russian emigrant Naum Gabo, and other artists. These included peter, Terry Frost, Patrick Heron, bryan and roger. St Ives also houses the Leach Pottery, where Bernard Leach, and his followers championed Japanese inspired studio pottery. Much of this modernist work can be seen in tate ives. The Newlyn Society and Penwith Society of Arts continue to be active, and contemporary visual art is documented in a dedicated online journal.

Music and festivals

Cornwall has a full and vibrant folk muic tradition which has survived into the present and is well known for its unusual folk survivals such as Mummers Plays, the furry dance in helston played by the famous helston, and obby in padstow.

As in other former mining districts of Britain, male voice choirs and brass band, e.g. Brass on the Grass concerts during the summer at constantine, are still very popular in Cornwall: Cornwall also has around 40 brass bands, including the six-times National Champions of Great Britain, Camborne Youth Band, and the bands of lanner and St Dennis.

Cornish players are regular participants in inter-Celtic festivals, and Cornwall itself has several lively inter-Celtic festivals such as Perranporth's Lowender Peran folk festival.

On a more modern note, contemporary musician ricard (also known as Aphex Twin) grew up in Cornwall, as did luke and alex winner of fame academy 2003. roger, the drummer from the band queen was also raised in the county, and currently lives not far from falmouth. The American singer/songwriter tori amos now resides predominantly in North Cornwall not far from Bude with her family. The lutenist, lutarist, composer and festival director ben lives in trurco

Cuisine

Cornwall is perhaps best known though for its pasties, a savoury dish made with pastry. Today's pasties usually contain a filling of beef steak, onion, potato andswede with salt and white pepper, but historically pasties had a variety of different fillings. "Turmut, 'tates and mate" (i.e. "Turnip, potatoes and meat", turnip being the Cornish and Scottish term for swede, itself an abbreviation of 'Swedish Turnip') describes a filling once very common. For instance, the licky pasty contained mostly leeks, and the herb pasty contained watercress, parsley, and shallots. Pasties are often locally referred to as oggies. Historically, pasties were also often made with sweet fillings such as jam, apple and blackberry, plums or cherries The wet climate and relatively poor soil of Cornwall make it unsuitable for growing many arable crops. However, it is ideal for growing the rich grass required for dairying, leading to the production of Cornwall's other famous export, clotted cream. This forms the basis for many local specialities including Cornish fudge and Cornish ice cream. Cornish clotted cream has Protected Geographical Status under EU law, and cannot be made anywhere else. Its principal manufacturer is Rodda's, based at Scorrier.

Local cakes and desserts include Saffron cake, Cornish heavy cake, Cornish fairings biscuits, figgy 'obbin, Cream tea and whortleberry pie.

There are also many types of beers brewed in Cornwall – those produced by Sharp's Brewery, Skinner's Brewery and St Austell Brewery are the best-known – including stouts, ales and other beer types. There is some small scale production of wine, mead and cider

Sports and games

With its comparatively small, and largely rural population, major contribution by the Cornish to national sport in the United Kingdom has been limited, with the county's greatest successes coming in fencing. In 2014, half of the men's GB team fenced for Truro Fencing Club, and 3 Truro fencers appeared at the 2012 Olympics. Truro, all of the towns and some villages have football clubs belonging to the Cornwall County Football , and the Cornwall County Cricket Club plays as one of the minor counties of English cricket. Viewed as an "important identifier of ethnic affiliation", rugby has become a sport strongly tied to notions of Cornishness and since the 20th century, rugby union in Cornwall has emerged as one of the most popular spectator and team sports in Cornwall (perhaps the most popular), with professional Cornish rugby footballers being described as a "formidable force", "naturally independent, both in thought and deed, yet paradoxically staunch English patriots whose top players have represented England with pride and passion". In 1985, sports journalist Alan Gibson made a direct connection between love of rugby in Cornwall and the ancient parish games of hurling and wrestling that existed for centuries before rugby officially began.Among Cornwall's native sports are a distinctive form of Celtic wrestling related to Breton wrestling, and Cornish hurling, a kind of mediaeval football played with a silver ball (distinct from Irish . Cornish Wrestling is Cornwall's oldest sport and as Cornwall's native tradition it has travelled the world to places like Victoria, Australia and Grass Valley, California following the miners and gold rushes. Cornish hurling now takes place at St. Columb Major, St Ives, and less frequently at Bodmin.