North Atlantic Right Whales

The Eubalaena glacialis

By Victoria Wu

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An Endangered Species

These North Atlantic Right Whales, (aka The Eubalaena Glacialis) are endangered. Beforehand, these whales were killed because whalers thought these whales were the "right" whales to hunt. They were slower than the others, stayed close to land, they float after they died, and their quality in oil made them good animals to target. Today, the species is currently threatened by ship collisions, entanglement in fishing nets, and separation from calving from because of shipping traffic. The North Atlantic Right Whale is found in coastal areas, so it is more likely to suffer from human activity than the other open-water whales, dolphins, or porpoises.

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Habitats

The whales live in the Atlantic Ocean; where these whales had lived in for a long time; and they are still living there. The ocean temperature is usually temperate to sub polar, and there are also angelfish and bluefin tuna living with the whales in the Atlantic ocean.

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Physical Adaptations

North Atlantic Right Whales have baleen plates, which filter to strain and separate food from a mouthful of water. To make sure this helpful doesn't stop, we just kept water and food, so they could keep on using this adaptation and we wouldn't interfere with it. These Right Whales also have lots of blubber, which helps keep the whales insulated, while giving the whales a streamline shape and stores energy for the whale. To keep this blubber in use, we put in a lot of prey, so they could keep on storing energy, stay insulated, and keep the streamline shape they need.

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Behavioral Adaptations

North Atlantic Right Whales are skimmers; using their baleen plates, they feed by removing prey from the water while moving with their mouth open. This keeps the water they don't need out, but gives them the food they need. To keep this adaptation, we just kept the water in kept the prey in, so they could keep the adaptation without us interfering with it. The whales also migrate. The whales migrate between feeding grounds in the Gulf of Maine And their winter calving areas in Georgia and Florida. To make sure it felt like they were still in the wild while being in the zoo, we made sure that we made the temperature the same for the places they migrate to. This helps keep the babies alive and make them feel like they're in the wild.

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Impact of Moving the Whales

If you move the whales to a different habitat, the whales will either die, because they can't adapt to it, or they will survive, and decrease the native species that live there. For example, the Cane Toads were taken to Australia to fix a problem with beetles, but the cane toads didn't eat the beetles and instead started eating the native toads that were there before. If you take a saltwater shark, and move it into freshwater, the saltwater shark would die, because it can't adapt to the freshwater, and the freshwater doesn't have the type of water they're used to and need.

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The Food Web

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The Energy Pyramid

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The Habitat Model