The War On Drugs

EQ: Is the war on drugs succeeding?

Opium

Opium is a liquid secreted by opium poppies, a plant native to many regions, but particularly common in Afghanistan, Laos, Cambodia, and Thailand. Opium is the natural source of narcotic drugs. Traditionally, opium has been made into medicinal products such as tincture of opium. These traditional drugs were used medicinally to treat diarrhea and as sedatives, tranquilizers, and analgesics. They have largely been replaced by newer drugs.

Much of the opium produced today is diverted to illegal use, particularly for the making of heroin. Because the poppy is found in areas of extreme poverty, farmers continue to cultivate the plants. The most successful efforts to reduce illegal production of opium poppies have been to find alternative cash crops. The United Nations has had great success with this method.

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Effects of heroin

An estimated 13.5 million people in the world take opium related drugs today

Is the war on drugs Getting better or worse

If the global drug trade were a country, it would have one of the top 20 economies in the world. The United Nations estimates there are 230 million illegal drug users in the world, yet 90% of them are not classified

In Conclusion...

The answer to my Essential Question, Is the war on drugs succeeding, is yes the war on drugs is succeeding. The war on drugs will never end due to other countries illegally using drugs. The closest thing we can do ending the war is to cut down on the use of drugs.

So just listen to Scruff Mcgruff and...

Citations

"Introduction to The War on Drugs: Opposing Viewpoints." The War on Drugs. Ed. Tamara L. Roleff. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2004. Opposing Viewpoints. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2015.


Hutchinson, Asa. "The War on Drugs Is Succeeding." The War on Drugs. Ed. Tamara L. Roleff. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2004. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "speech to Baylor University." 2002. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2015.


Lynch, Michael W. "The War on Drugs Has Corrupted Law Enforcement." The War on Drugs. Ed. Tamara L. Roleff. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2004. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "Battlefield Conversions." Reason 33 (Jan. 2002): 36. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 8 Dec. 2015.