Quartered Safe Out Here

By George MacDonald Fraser

George MacDonald Fraser

George MacDonald Fraser, (April 2 1925 – January 2 2008) was an English-born author of Scottish descent, who wrote historical novels, non-fiction books and several screenplays. He is best known for a series of works that featured the character Flashman.

World War II Overview

It was the bloodiest, deadliest war the world had ever seen. More than 38 million people died, many of them innocent civilians. It also was the most destructive war in history. Fighting raged in many parts of the world. More than 50 nations took part in the war, which changed the world forever.

For Americans, World War II had a clear-cut purpose. People knew why they were fighting: to defeat tyranny. Most of Europe had been conquered by Nazi Germany, which was under the iron grip of dictator Adolf Hitler. The war in Europe began with Germany's invasion of Poland in 1939. Wherever the Nazis went, they waged a campaign of terror, mainly against Jews, but also against other minorities.

In Asia and the Pacific, Japanese armies invaded country after country, island after island. On December 7, 1941, Japanese planes bombed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The next day, the U.S. Congress declared war, taking the U.S. into World War II.

Summary of "Quartered Safe Out Here"

George MacDonald Fraser, British author of the Flashman series of novels, fought in the 17th (Black Cat) Indian Division of the 14th Army during the siege of Meiktila and the battle of Pyawbwe in Burma. He believed, probably correctly, that soldiering in Burma rivaled flying in the RAF's Bomber Command as "the worst ticket you could draw in the lottery of active service." This was so not just because of the Japanese enemy; there were also 15-inch poisonous centipedes, malaria, "spiders the size of plates," typhus, jungle sores on the wrists and ankles, dysentery, and leeches. In terse, unsentimental language, Fraser's superb war memoir, "Quartered Safe Out Here," relates how the soldiers in his close-knit company fought their battles, mourned their friends and simply tried to survive from day to day.

Writer's Purpose/Reaction

I believe Fraser used this memoir to express himself and to inform people what the War was like from a firsthand perspective.


Reading this book was a true delight. Fraser is an excellent writer and knows how to tell a story. He can be very funny at times but also knows how to approach serious material. After reading I was very satisfied with this book.

Recommendation

I would recommend this to anyone looking for detailed insight of one soldier's experience from a portion of the war.