Title IX, Making History.

Title XI Changing the Game for College Women Athletics

What is Title IX?

Title IX is a comphrehensive fedral law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any fedrally funded education program or activity. By the end of the 1960s, it was clear that female collegiate athletics were grossly underfunded. Public figures such as Billy Jean King began to speak out about the inequality between men and women in higher education. Data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) provide information concerning personnel, revenues, expenses and other comparative variables of men’s and women’s intercollegiate athletics programs at NCAA member institutions for the fiscal years 2004 through 2010. Comparing the 2004 data to the 2010 data reveals increases in the proportion of female student athletes. During this time, there was an approximately 14 percentage point increase in the proportion of female student athletes in Division I, a 21 percentage point increase for women in Division II, and a 14 percentage point increase for women in Division III.

Women Deserve More!

Women athletic teams at the college level have great skills but are not provided with the funds they need because college spends more money on male athletics. The organization fought to keep female athletics separate from male athletics to ensure equal funding for equipment and scholarships, while athletes and coaches were beginning to feel that the organization was holding them back. By isolating female athletics, the WIAA inadvertently caused male and female athletics to be viewed as unequal. For example, male athletics are funded $210,000 a year to where women are only funded $160,00. These problems are not from students but the NCAA program. It is important to review historical information on the NCAA/the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) merger and federal civil rights laws on educational access and employment opportunities to better understand current issues related to women in collegiate sport leadership.

The History of Inequality

Restrictions on female athletic participation were originally put in place by female physical education instructors. During the first two decades of the 20th century, opportunities for women to participate in collegiate sports were continually diminished, according to the Women's Sports Foundation. By the early 1920s women were only allowed to participate in sports via recreational sports days, because it was thought that too much physical exertion was unhealthy for the female body and would result in masculinization. Competition and exertion were downplayed during these friendly sports days, and socialization was the central theme. During both World War II and the Vietnam War, significant portions of the male population were sent to support the war effort. With fewer men available to participate in sports in the U.S., opportunities for women to participate increased exponentially. Female university students were able to take advantage of a growing opportunity to compete with girls from other schools and began to organize female athletic leagues. This movement coincided with the beginning of the feminist movement, and the notion that women should be represented equally in collegiate sports was advanced.

Work Cited Page

"Gemder Inequality." U.S. Department of Justice. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.

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"LIVESTRONG.COM - Lose Weight & Get Fit with Diet, Nutrition & Fitness Tools | LIVESTRONG.COM." LIVESTRONG.COM. LIVESTRONG.COM, n.d. Web. 07 Mar. 2015.

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