Quality Questioning

The key to making content connections in Social Studies.

Big image
Big image

When you are done...

What do you need from me today?

On a sticky note-


  • What are your concerns?
  • What resources do you need?
  • How is your year going?


Make sure to write your name on your sticky note so I know what you need!

Norms for the Day

  • Stay on schedule, be on time.
  • Participate and listen actively.
  • Take care of your self and your neighbor.
  • Prepare your technology for learning and engagement.
  • It's OK to have fun!
Big image

Agenda for the Day

9:00-9:10 Intorductions/Norms/Expectations

9:10-10:00 Questioning Activity

10:00-10:10 BREAK

10:10-10:45 Scaffolding Tools

10:45-11:30 Writing Questions

11:30-1:00 LUNCH

1:00-2:10 DOK Student Questioning

2:10-2:20 BREAK

2:20-3:20 DOK Student Questioning

3:20-3:30 Wrap Up/Evaluations

Big image

Before we get started...

Sticky Note Scale Activity

Rank your answers ,on a scale of 1-5, to the following statements on a PINK sticky note.


Write a QQ on your PINK sticky note.


  • The questions I ask in class are standards-based and provide quality feedback for student learning.


Write a S on your PINK sticky note.


  • The questions I ask in class are scaffolded to achieve maximum learning outcomes.


Write a P on your PINK sticky note.


  • I plan the questions I ask during instruction.
Big image

As you participate in the next activity, ask yourself this question:

Why are you here today?
Big image
Big image

Questioning Activity

Each station will have a standard and a primary source. Each group will have a colored marker specific to their group.


Round One: Write down everything you know about the picture.


Round Two: Write down questions based on the primary source and what you know. Questions may not be repeated!


Round Three: Answer the questions.

Reflection Time

Big image

Gaona's Guidelines for Quality Questioning

Quality Questioning should...

1. start with the standards

2. culminate to an essential question in every lesson

3. be scaffolded (difficulty or relevance) to maximize student success

4. be imbedded into your lesson planning process


If you are at a dead end- let your students do the work!

Big image
Big image

Always start with the standards!

Big image

Finish each lesson with an essential question!

Big image
Gaona- Learning Objective and Summary Statement Form

This is one way to hold yourself and your students accountable to an essential question daily.

Students can't answer this question-

Big image

Because these are the questions we ask in class-

  • When was the Mayflower Compact written?
  • What did it say?
  • What was important about the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut?
  • Why was Rhode Island established?
Write an essential question for this standard with this question in mind. Share it on the Padlet (link below).

Backwards Design Document from TEKS Resource System

Big image
Big image

scaffold- and then scaffold- and then scaffold some more...

Big image

Scaffolding based on difficulty

Structuring your questions to go from:


  • Low
  • Medium
  • High


to achieve higher connections.

Big image
Big image

What questions would you add, remove, or change?

Big image

What questions would you add, remove, or change?

Big image

What questions would you add, remove, or change?

Big image

What questions would you add, remove, or change?

Big image

Scaffolding Activity

Choose one visual and write 6 scaffolding questions.


  • Write 2 low questions.
  • Write 2 medium questions.
  • Write 2 high questions.


Put each question into a historical scaffolding category.


Table Talk

Share your questions with your table.


As you share each question, ask which historical scaffolding question set your table mates would use. Do you agree?

Historical Scaffolding

Feel free to use this in your classroom!

What grade would you give the questions you ask in class? Think about the answers you are receiving...

Big image

Do you plan the questions you ask during instruction?

Reflect on the questions that you pose to your students...

What percentage do you plan before class?


Would your students say that your questions are-

  • clear?
  • succinct?
  • understandable?

What are the benefits to planning the questions you ask during instruction?

Big image

Let's put it all together!

The Real World...

1. Choose a concept that you will be teaching next week. Pick something that your students struggle with, or you struggle teaching. Find the standard(s) that address this concept.


2. Write an essential question that you believe addresses the standard to the depth and complexity necessary.


3. Write the scaffolding questions that you believe are necessary for students to make the needed connections to correctly answer the essential question for the day.


4. How will students be expected to interact with this content in order to be able to answer your essential question correctly?

Big image

Share your lesson plans with your partner!

Big image

Sticky Note Scale Activity

Rank your answers ,on a scale of 1-5, to the following statements on a BLUE sticky note.


Write a QQ on your BLUE sticky note.


  • I feel more prepared in asking questions that are standards-based and provide quality feedback for student learning.


Write a S on your BLUE sticky note.


  • I feel more prepared in asking questions that are scaffolded to achieve maximum learning outcomes.


Write a P on your BLUE sticky note.


  • I feel more prepared in planning the questions I ask during instruction.
Big image
Big image
Big image
Big image

Sticky Note Scale Activity

Rank your answers ,on a scale of 1-5, to the following statements on a PINK sticky note.


Write a P on your PINK sticky note.


  • I plan time in class for students to create and ask questions.


Write a S on your PINK sticky note.


  • The questions students ask in class are focused and increase the knowledge of their content.


Write a C on your PINK sticky note.


  • I have set structures in place in my classroom where students are comfortable asking me or their peers questions in class.
Big image
Big image

Student Generated Questioning

Resources provided by Kagan Cooperative Learning

Please click on the link to access these resources for you to use on your campus.

Higher Level Thinking

Big image

Graph Reflection

  1. What conclusions can be made from the graph?
  2. Do you feel the graph accurately reflects the questions asked by students in your classroom?
  3. Does this trend need to change?
Big image
Big image

Norman Webb's DOK

1. Read for 5 minutes with annotations.

2. Share with a partner 3 minutes.

3. Group share out for 2 minutes.

Social Studies Example

Big image
Big image

Let's check out a question...

Read this question from the 2014 8th grade STAAR.


Discuss at your table what DOK level you think this question fits into. Be prepared to explain your thinking.

Big image

Difference between Bloom's Taxaonomy and Webb's Depth of Knowledge

Big image

Attention Span for your audience.

Always be aware of your audience's attention span and how that should affect your questioning.


Take into consideration:


  • Age
  • When to Scaffold
  • When should students answer the most difficult questions for your lesson?
Big image
Kagan Spencer Interview Part 1
Big image

What would you say is your students average attention span time?

Big image

Retention...

Do you agree with these statistics?


What does this mean for your instruction?

Based on this data, who should be asking the questions?

Big image

Q-Matrix: Pick a picture and write questions for points!

Q-Spinner

1) Each person spins one spinner

2) Each person writes a question

3) Continue steps 1-2 until each person has 5 questions

4) Discuss your questions and answers

Big image

Q- Dice

  • Partner Up- you need 2 Dice
  • Turn one dice on the HOW question
  • Write 4 Questions about the Civil War based on how the other dice roles



—#1 Leaders

—

—#2 Slavery

—

—#3 States’ Rights

—

—#4 Economy

Big image

Higher level- roll both dice and then insert both words into the question, not as a beginning of a sentence (embed in a situation).

Q- Chips

1. Draw a chip

2. Choose a vocabulary box

3. Write a question using at least 3 of the words in the box

Q- Cards

  • Pass out Q Cards as an exit ticket or bell ringer.
  • Have a visual posted for students to create questions.
  • Use them during the next class!
Big image

Vertical Q- Strips

  1. Pick a strip
  2. Take turns asking questions with your partner
  3. Create questions based on the next visual
Big image

Horizontal Q-Strips

  1. Pick a strip
  2. Take turns asking questions with your partner
  3. Create questions based on the next visual
Big image
Big image

Create questions based on the hypothetical situation, that George Washington and Abraham Lincoln switched roles in history.

Big image

Sticky Note Scale Activity

Rank your answers ,on a scale of 1-5, to the following statements on a PINK sticky note.


Write a P on your BLUE sticky note.


  • I plan time in class for students to create and ask questions.


Write a S on your BLUE sticky note.


  • The questions students ask in class are focused and increase the knowledge of their content.


Write a C on your BLUE sticky note.


  • I have set structures in place in my classroom where students are comfortable asking me or their peers questions in class.
Big image

What do we need to consider when we start planning the questions we ask in the classroom?

Reflection on Student Questioning

What do we need to consider when we start planning the questions we ask in the classroom?

What are 3 tools that you learned today?

Table share what you learned and how you are going to use them in your classroom.
Big image

Extended Professional Development Opportunities!

Two more options to get 2 more PD hours!

1. Twitter Chat- December 10th on Quality Questioning. Earn 2 hours od PD credit by participating in this Twitter Chat!

Register NOW!

https://txr17.escworks.net/catalog/session.aspx?session_id=43203


2. Share your classroom application of today's workshop! Email me a description of how you used today's PD with your students. Include the standards, lesson focus, and pictures of student work. This will not only reward you with great classroom instruction, but also 2 hours of PD credit!

Thank you for coming today!

  1. Wrap Up
  2. Clean Up
  3. Evaluations

Please contact me if you need anything or have any questions!

Big image