Hawaiian Monarchy Nonexistent

Overthrowing Hawaiian Culture to Create American Culture

The Contribution

On January 17, 1893, was not only the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom, but also a sudden end in Hawaiian culture and living. It would not have occurred without the roles that President McKinley, President Cleveland, and U.S. Minister John Stevens had played.

The Overthrows' Significance

On January 17, 1893, was officially the Overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom; but was also a significant end in Hawaiian culture and living. Without the roles that President McKinley, President Cleveland, and U.S. Minister John Stevens had played; things would have been quite different today. The overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom is important in history because it wasn't just an overthrow of another state-in-the-making; it was taking something that wasn't deemed perfect and was created into a totally different thing. Hawaii may not have seemed perfect in the American's eyes, but it was well off on it's own with their monarchy and Queen because they weren't looking for a perfect society; they had a spiritual connection to their home. This event in history was a very life changing event for the Hawaiians at that time and it was a very harsh and difficult period of time. What I want people to realize is the determination and passion these Hawaiians had to keep their home as their own.

Legally and Lawfully?

After studying about the Overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom, it’s made me question whether or not Hawaii really is legally and lawfully a state of the union. At this point, I believe that we are lawfully a state of the union, but not a state that was willing to be a part of the United States. Though technically it wasn’t legal because there was no treaty signed, hence no actual document stating Hawaii being given to the U.S.

Aloha 'Oe

Aloha 'Oe was written by Queen Lili'uokalani herself. This song was supposedly intended to be a love song; with the lyrics saying, "farewell to you, the charming one who dwells in the shaded bowers.." But with the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom, the song had turned into a farewell song. Aloha 'Oe had become the Queen's song as a farewell to Hawai'i's loss of independence and becoming a part of the United States. "Farewell to you, farewell to you...'ere I depart, until we meet again."
Queen Lili'uokalani - Aloha'Oe

Work Cited

William McKinley. N.d. Web. 6 Mar. 2015. <http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6d/Mckinley.jpg>.

John L. Stevens. N.d. Web. 6 Mar. 2015. <http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/04/Johnlstevens.jpg>.

Grover Cleveland. N.d. Web. 6 Mar. 2015. <http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/55/StephenGroverCleveland.png>.

Pitzer, Pat. "The Overthrow of the Monarchy." The Overthrow of the Monarchy. Aloha Airlines, n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2015. <http://www.hawaii-nation.org/soa.html>.

"The Annexation of Hawaii." Digital History. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Mar. 2015. <http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/disp_textbook.cfm?smtID=2&psid=3159>.

"Miller Center." American President: American President. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://millercenter.org/president/events/07_07>.

"Aloha Oe." Aloha Oe. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.huapala.org/Aloha/Aloha_Oe.html>.