The Himalayan Quake

Nepal's Nightmare

INTRODUCTION

The April 2015 Nepal earthquake (also known as the Gorkha earthquake) killed more than 8,800 people and injured more than 23,000. It occurred at 11:56 NST on 25 April, with a magnitude of 7.8. Its epicenter was east of the district of Lamjung.

REASONS

1.Nepal is particularly prone to earthquakes. It sits on the boundary of two massive tectonic plates – the Indo-Australian and Asian plates. It is the collision of these plates that has produced the Himalaya mountains, and with them, earthquakes.


2. The hidden reason behind the massive earthquake is the regular movement of the fault line that runs along Nepal’s southern border, where the Indian plate collided with the Eurasian plate 40 million to 50 million years ago.


3.As the plates push against each other, friction generates stress and energy that builds until the crust ruptures.1.Nepal is particularly prone to earthquakes. It sits on the boundary of two massive tectonic plates – the Indo-Australian and Asian plates. It is the collision of these plates that has produced the Himalaya mountains, and with them, earthquakes.

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CHALLENGES FACED BY THE RESCUE TEAM

Governments across the globe have deployed emergency assistance following Nepal's deadliest earthquake in nearly a century. But response teams face increasing difficulties as the death toll continues to rise. id groups and governments intensified efforts to help Nepal. However, blocked roads, collapsed buildings, and continuing aftershocks pose major setbacks for emergency crews searching for survivors in the capital and cut-off rural areas. About 90 percent of soldiers from the Nepalese Army were sent to the stricken areas in the aftermath of the earthquake under Operation Sankat Mochan, with volunteers mobilized from other parts of the country. Rainfall and aftershocks were factors complicating the rescue efforts, with potential secondary effects like additional landslides and further building collapses being concerns.

DURING AN EARTHQUAKE..

  • DROP down onto your hands and knees (before the earthquakes knocks you down). This position protects you from falling but allows you to still move if necessary.

  • COVER your head and neck (and your entire body if possible) under a sturdy table or desk. If there is no shelter nearby, only then should you get down near an interior wall (or next to low-lying furniture that won't fall on you), and cover your head and neck with your arms and hands.

  • HOLD ON to your shelter (or to your head and neck) until the shaking stops. Be prepared to move with your shelter if the shaking shifts it around.