Elementary Science Apps

Applications to supplement student learning

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Table of Contents

--Introduction--

--Mobile Learning Overview--

--Mobile Devices Overview--

--Examples of mLearning Devices--

--Khan Academy--

--Napoleon Bone Apart--

--How to Make Electricity: School Edition--

--DNA Play--

--MarcoPolo Weather--

--goREACT--

--Solar System--

--EveryCircuit--

--Alberta Program of Studies (Science)--

--Challenges of mLearning--

--Additional Resources--

--Links to Social Media--

--Mystery Video--

--About the Author--

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Introduction

The use of smartphones and tablets by K-12 students has increased dramatically in the last few years. As a result, teachers are trying to find ways to leverage students’ proficiency with these devices, by integrating them into their teaching and by making lessons more interactive. In this section you will learn about the concept of mobile learning - the process of learning using mobile devices and apps - and how such a learning techniques can be integrated into the K-12 classroom and how this technology facilitates the blended learning environment and use of eTextbooks (EDU 210, module 9).

mLearning is a learning environment which presents unique attributes compared to conventional e-Learning in that it is; personal; portable; collaborative; interactive; contextual; and situated. Some of the potential mLearning benefits are; convenience and flexibility; relevance; learner control; context sensitive learning; personalization; collaboration (cloud); asynchronous learning. On the contrary, some potential mLearning challenges are; infrastructure; managing a class set of mDevices; device plurality (BYOD); Digital Divide (Equity); lack of teacher confidence / training.


In this module, we were asked to explore 5 different apps that support personal mobile learning (mLearning) and provide some examples of how they could be used. Below are 7 apps for personal mobile learning.

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Mobile Learning Overview

Mobile learning is the ability to obtain or provide educational content on personal pocket devices such as PDAs, smartphones and mobile phones. Educational content refers to digital learning assets which includes any form of content or media made available on a personal device.


E-learning has come to define any dissemination of educational knowledge over the Internet. This makes e-learning a subset of technology-based training. It also incorporates a number of learning activities conducted on the Internet, of which mobile learning is one part.


E-learning can be real-time or self-paced, also known as "synchronous" or "asynchronous" learning. Additionally, e-learning is considered to be “tethered” (connected to something) and presented in a formal and structured manner. In contrast, mobile learning is often self-paced, un-tethered and informal in its presentation.


Because mobile devices have the power to make learning even more widely available and accessible, mobile devices are considered by many to be a natural extension of e-learning. With information and communications technology becoming portable and individual-oriented, we are today experiencing the first level of effective mobile learning as it was envisioned decades ago.


The objectives of mLearning entail:


-Encourage ‘anywhere, anytime’ learning Mobile devices allow students to gather, access, and process information outside the classroom. They can encourage learning in a real-world context, and help bridge school, after school, and home environments.


-Reach underserved children Because of their relatively low cost and accessibility in low-income communities, handheld devices can help advance digital equity, reaching and inspiring populations ‘at the edges’ – children from economically disadvantaged communities and those from developing countries.


-Improve twenty-first century social interactions Mobile technologies have the power to promote and foster collaboration and communication, which are deemed essential for twenty-first century success.


-Fit with learning environments Mobile devices can help overcome many of the challenges associated with larger technologies, as they fit more naturally within various learning environments.


-Enable a personalized learning experience. Not all children are alike; instruction should be adaptable to individual and diverse learners. There are significant opportunities for genuinely supporting differentiated, autonomous, and individualized learning through mobile devices.


mobl21,. (2015). Mobile Learning Basics. Retrieved 26 November 2015, from http://www.mobl21.com/Basics_Of_Mobile_Learning.pdf

Mobile Learning: What is that?
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Mobile Devices Overview

It is important to choose a mobile device that will support your level of use.


-First, ask yourself what you're trying to achieve by incorporating mobile devices into your curriculum. Are you trying to encourage collaboration? Hoping for students to research with more depth? Want them to publish their work online? The answers will lead you to the right apps.


-Survey your students about what devices they have and how they use them. Do they have unlimited texting? Can they post online? Are there limitations on the size of files they can upload? With this information, you will have a complete picture of what resources your students can access without having to pay massive extra fees, which may not be feasible for some of them.


-Encourage students to make suggestions about which apps work for them. This allows everyone to contribute to your mobile learning initiative—a great way to get them on board. Plus, the class can discover new apps and become proficient at them together.


-Any technology tool that students have at their disposal can be leveraged in the classroom to make powerful learning inferences. Accessing information online is just the beginning; students can use electronic gadgets for creating interactive projects and multimedia that contribute to their inquiry-based study.


-For more ideas, read education consultant Ben Johnson’s post on iPads in the classroom at Edutopia: bit.ly/rZ6twh.


Edutopia,. (2015). Mobile Devices for Learning - What You Need to Know. Retrieved 26 November 2015, from http://www.edutopia.org/pdfs/guides/edutopia-mobile-learning-guide.pdf

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Edutopia,. (2015). Mobile Devices for Learning - What You Need to Know. Retrieved 26 November 2015, from http://www.edutopia.org/pdfs/guides/edutopia-mobile-learning-guide.pdf
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Khan Academy’s app provides a comprehensive library of topics and skills that support Common Core goals. It includes a wealth of information particularly on middle school and high school classes, as well as useful topics for college students and adults. In simplistic terms, the app gives students access to the Khan Academy library of instructional videos and practice activities for thousands of skills from early childhood through collegiate level. Activities relevant to science are prominent, as the activities are organized by grade and subject matter, and the search function will allow students to pull up specific skills based on keywords they type in. The app features thousands of interactive exercises, instructional videos and in-depth readings, and a built-in scratch pad for working out solutions or writing thoughts. Additionally, teachers can teach their students progress within the app using the progress tracking system on Khan Academy's website.


In terms of applications in education, the Khan Academy App is an excellent resource for teaching and learning elementary science because it feature hundreds of sequential lessons, ranging from simple complex to highly complex. Each topic includes some instructional material in the form of short videos and/or reading, as well as interactive exercises that will help students practice. There are hints available for most topics and students can access the instructional information from the exercises page, as well. The app also notes when hints or instructional information has been accessed. All of these records are kept in the student’s account on the Khan Academy website, which can be accessed by teachers.


Students can use the app to review concepts which are still unfamiliar to them, or learn new concepts if they were absent when it was taught. In addition, the app makes a great resource for students to use during test prep. The instructional videos are well-constructed, using voice over and a combination of photos, illustrations, animations and screen captures. The videos are surprisingly interesting, and therefore, are engaging and will keep students coming back for more practice. The app reminds students periodically that extra practice is the key to mastering skills, and keeps record of the time the program has been accessed and what has been accomplished, so teachers can see and interpret tangible results.


As the teacher, you must keep expenses in mind, which is the beauty of the Khan Academy app, which is completely free. There are no third party adds and no in-app purchases, which is good for younger students and gives parents peace of mind. It can be used without an account, however, if students don't have an account, the app doesn't store records. This can be used if you want to preserve your students anonymity. The app does need to be connected to the internet for proper functionality.


I'd use this app to supplement my lectures on topics I don't feel I have sufficient knowledge to teach. In addition, I'd tell all my students to download it and if they ever are unsure about a topic to watch the video on it in Khan Academy before coming to ask me; chances are there question will be answered in the videos. And if I students who I'm aware will be absent, I'd send them the links to the videos which deal with the content they'll be missing.


This app relates to the Alberta Science Program of Studies across the board as the app is very open ended and covers virtually all topics learned in the K-6 curriculum in Alberta. With that said, it relates to multiple outcomes, and as such, would be redundant to list them all here. If you'd like to view these outcomes for yourself, follow this link: https://education.alberta.ca/media/654825/elemsci.pdf


https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/khan-academy-you-can-learn/id469863705?mt=8


Below are images and screenshots pertinent to the app. Below these, is an external app review of the Khan Academy app, taken from YouTube.

Khan Academy App Review and Demo on ABC News with Francie Black

Napoleon Bone Apart is an app designed to teach kids about the skeletal system. Kids can drag and drop the bones onto the skeleton and learn the names of some of the major parts of their bodies.


When kids select a bone, they hear its name. Once they’ve placed the bone, its name appears on the screen and the name of the bone is repeated twice. The repetition helps reinforce the names of the bones in kids’ memories. In the settings section kids can also turn on labels which displays all the names of the bones on the sides of the screen. While this doesn’t seem to be an extremely useful feature, it does offer one more way to help the names of the bones stick in kids’ minds. The simple nature of the app makes it ideal for a range of ages and grade-levels. Even a kindergartener can place the bones and begin to understand where they’re located on their own body. I feel this app fits in excellent with the curriculum and PoS for elementary science. The app costs $1.99, and for the relatively low price kids get a decent introduction to the skeletal system with the names of all of the bones clearly highlighted. Since the game resets after kids complete it, they also get the chance to practice placing the bones as many times as they want.


Teachers should be aware that some younger kids may be scared by the bright white skeleton on a black background, particularly when it starts to dance. This app has no external links, no social media, no 3rd party ads, and no in-app purchases.


I would use this app as an test prep for my students because it's an excellent study resource. Prior to testing, students could use this as a way to check their understanding.


This app relates to the Alberta Science Program of Studies Grade 3 Topic B, 'Building with a Variety of Materials', with emphasis on Problem Solving through Technology. According to 3-6, students "Use, safely, a variety of tools, techniques and materials in construction activities". If you'd like to view these outcomes for yourself, follow this link: https://education.alberta.ca/media/654825/elemsci.pdf


https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/napoleon-bone-apart/id890966725?mt=8


Below are images and screenshots pertinent to the app. Below these, is an external video of the app used in action.

Napoleon Bone Apart (Windows & Mac)

How to Make Electricity is an interactive app that allows children to engage in and explore various methods of making electricity. Using the app, students can see how the electricity reacts in various situations. There is also a ‘science view’ that allows children to get an in-depth look at the electric current flowing (or not) through the circuit they have created.


The app has great visuals and interactive images throughout. Within each experimental area there is a variety of scientific items and tools for children to play with as they explore how electricity works. The sound effects are also very well done and they add to the overall realistic feel to the app with clicking, zapping, and other fun sounds that make children feel like they are really in a laboratory experimenting. This app is also fairly easy to play as children have the freedom to tap and drag items into place without a ton of instruction or help.


The app is designed to teach children through interactive play how electricity flows through various items and scientific tools. The learning environment is self-guided so players can move through each experimental area on their own and enjoy the freedom of experimenting as they choose. The experimental areas are broken down into chemical, hydro, thermal, and solar and there are a wide variety of items like coils, potatoes, light bulbs and the like included for children to experiment with.


The idea behind the app is to inspire free playing and open experimentation. However, it would be nice to provide some educational information earlier in the app and not just when students receive a discovery reward. Perhaps an additional information section that teaches the name of the tools used or more scientific terms that provides information about making electricity would be a bit more helpful for children wanting to learn about this topic.


This app is ideal for elementary science as it encourages students to explore and discover. The potential downside is that students who aren't as enthusiastic about science may become unengaged sooner.


Priced at $2.99, this app is a good value for what it provides. For children who love science and experimenting with various tools and items, this app is going to be well worth its price tag as students are likely to get a lot of playing time out of this app.This app is easy for children of all ages to use and contains no external links, no social media, no 3rd part ads, and no inn-app purchases.


I'd use this app as an intro to a unit on electricity as I'd encourage students to play around with it on their own and see if they can discover any reoccurring trends and patterns.


This app relates to the Alberta Science Program of Studies Grade 5 Topic A, 'Electricity and Magnetism', with emphasis on Science Inquiry. According to 5–5, students will "Demonstrate safe methods for the study of magnetism and electricity, identify methods for measurement and control, and apply techniques for evaluating magnetic and electrical properties of materials". If you'd like to view these outcomes for yourself, follow this link: https://education.alberta.ca/media/654825/elemsci.pdf


https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/how-to-make-electricity-school/id1016173423?mt=8


Below are images and screenshots pertinent to the app. Below these, is an external video of the app used in action.

How to Make Electricity Official Trailer #1 - CRAYON BOX App

DNA Play is a free-style educational app gives kids a very visual and interactive opportunity to begin to learn how DNA works. Overall this app is simple to play, fun to use, and offers hours of entertainment for children of all ages.


The user interface is highly interactive and encourages children to explore and create fun monsters while learning a bit about how DNA works. While children aren’t going to be learning the science and technical terms behind DNA, they will be getting a hands on lesson of how it works. As children re-position genes they see a creature they're creating change colour, shape, and size which is a great way to illustrate how genes are directly related to how each of us look. This offers teachers a way to create a fun and hands on learning experience when used in the classroom.


There is no doubt that children are going to get a ton of playing time and entertainment from this app as the fun sound effects, interesting creatures, and different combinations of options will keep children engaged. This engagement is critical for elementary science, and therefore will work great with the younger grades.


Priced at just under three dollars this app is a great value! This app has literally thousands of combinations to create and will keep children busy for hours. The fun sounds and accessories that pop up offer loads of entertainment for a low price which is vital for minimal teaching budgets. There are no external links, no social media, no 3rd party ads and no in-app purchases.


I'd use this app as an intro to a unit on genetics as I'd encourage students to play around with it on their own and see if they can discover any reoccurring trends and patterns.


This app relates to the Alberta Science Program of Studies Grade 2 Topic E, 'Small Crawling and Flying Animals', with emphasis on Science Inquiry. According to 2–10, students will "Describe the general structure and life habits of small crawling and flying animals; e.g., insects, spiders, worms, slugs; and apply this knowledge to interpret local species that have been observed". If you'd like to view these outcomes for yourself, follow this link: https://education.alberta.ca/media/654825/elemsci.pdf



https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/dna-play/id1033801524?mt=8


Below are images and screenshots pertinent to the app. Below these, is an external video of the app used in action.

DNA Play - Official App Trailer on Google Play by Avokiddo

MarcoPolo Weather is an app that allows students to explore and learn about various weather conditions. This free play app uses hands on play to encourage children to experiment with lots of fun accessories, characters, and clothing see how each are affected in the different temperature, wind, rain, and snow conditions.


The app has awesome illustrations, interactive images, bright colors, and fun sound effects to go along with each weather condition and accessories children use. There is narration through out for each weather condition that provides the definition of each condition which is great for children. Easy to use for young children, this app is a high quality learning tool for inquisitive minds.


MarcoPolo Weather is a great app to teach students about various weather conditions including rain, thunderstorms, blizzards, tornados, and hurricanes. The way the app is set up allows children to explore at their own pace as they interact with various accessories like flying a kite in the wind or putting a fire out on a cold night.

Through the inquisitive exploration based principles, this app is great for use in elementary science. The narrations throughout help educate children on the definitions of each weather condition without it being overwhelming.


A limited version of this app is offered for free, but the full version is available for just under two dollars which is a reasonable price. There is the in app purchase link and an advertisement button on the home page that are both protected.


I'd use this app in such a way that allows my students to apply their knowledge after completing a unit on weather. I'd assign them a predict the weather assignment where they have to predict the outcome of different scenarios, then test the scenarios using the app and judge whether their predictions were accurate or not.


This app relates to the Alberta Science Program of Studies Grade 5 Topic D, 'Weather Watch', with emphasis on Science Inquiry. According to 5–8 students will, "Observe, describe and interpret weather phenomena; and relate weather to the heating and cooling of Earth’s surface". If you'd like to view these outcomes for yourself, follow this link: https://education.alberta.ca/media/654825/elemsci.pdf


https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/marcopolo-weather/id905425870?mt=8


Below are images and screenshots pertinent to the app. Below these, is an external video of the app used in action.

MarcoPolo Weather - App Preview
goREACT is an app that allows students to learn and interact with a series of online chemical reactions by dragging elements into the Reaction Area. There are over 300 of these virtual chemical reactions. The app allows students to become virtual chemists, regardless of their background in chemistry, the app encourages engaging exploration! Whether a student is a novice or expert, the free play and guided modes make it fun and fascinating.


The app has amazing images and videos which illustrate the molecules students create. Students can select alternate views of the Periodic Table to discover different aspects of the elements’ chemical properties which they didn't know about before. The app has a feature that allows students to select any of the Periodic Table's 118 elements to see an image and fun fact about it. I really like the fact that the app has helpful hints about reactions to try, which means there’s always something exciting to explore. “Featured Reactions” menus guide you through themed sets of chemical reactions related to particular applications,such as the environment, beauty products or cars. In summation, this app will inherently cause students to learn more about how the Periodic Table is organized. It als has a series of additional educational links and such to follow for additional learning.


As I've previously mentioned, as the teacher, you must keep expenses in mind, which is the beauty of the goReact app, which is completely free. There are no third party adds and no in-app purchases, which is good for younger students and gives parents peace of mind. The app does need to be connected to the internet for proper functionality.


I would use this app to be an initial introduction to a science class at the beginning of a chemistry unit. This would enable students to get a general understanding of what happens when certain chemicals are combined and the resulting reactions that ensue. Furthermore, I would use this app to replace the traditional lab component to class if the chemicals are too dangerous to be handled by students, such as lead and mercury. Additionally, if a chemical reaction is too severe for class and not safe for students to do with the real chemicals I'd have them use this app to do the reaction so they can see the extreme reaction in the safest way possible.


This app relates to the Alberta Science Program of Studies Grade 5 Topic C, 'Classroom Chemistry', with emphasis on Science Inquiry. According to 5–7 students will "Describe the properties and interactions of various household liquids and solids, and interpret their interactions". If you'd like to view these outcomes for yourself, follow this link: https://education.alberta.ca/media/654825/elemsci.pdf


https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/goreact/id649585694?mt=8


Below are images and screenshots pertinent to the app. Below these, is an external video of the app used in action.

goReact

Solar System is an app that allows students to learn about the solar system and the intricate balances that are constantly ongoing in space. I really like Solar System because it offers hours of interactive exploration and presents a treasure trove of visual information.


The app is essentially an interactive narrative, authored by bestselling author Marcus Chown, which leads students on a grand tour through the incredible diversity of planets, moons, asteroids, comets and spacecraft that surround the Sun in our cosmic backyard. Illuminating his insightful and surprising text are a wealth of beautiful 3D objects, movies, images, animations, and diagrams, all fully interactive, richly detailed and accurately based on real scientific data. Students can control the orbits of the moons and planets, observing them from any viewpoint with breath-taking surface detail. The app allows for the viewing of the latest imagery returned by both manned and robot spacecraft. Students can then double-tap any astronomical object to jump directly to its chapter in the corresponding interactive book.

I would use this app in the beginning of an astrology unit because Solar System allows the imagination to roam free from Mercury to Pluto and beyond and I feel this will greatly help my students engage in the upcoming astrology unit.

It's worth noting that this is a highly regarded app as it was the winner of the FutureBook Digital Innovation Prize (The Bookseller Industry Awards) in March of 2011.

At $2.99, the app is an excellent value for the price tag because students will definitely get their moneys worth. I say this because there is so much content to this application that students will only begin to the scratch the surface on its offerings.The content and presentation truly make learning fun and inspiring.

With more than 150 pages, richly Illustrated with interactive diagrams, videos and 3D objects, the digital book that accommodates the app is as informative as it is beautiful and an excellent example of how to best take advantage of the mLearning medium. The app has over 40 rotatable and zoomable 3D astronomical objects from over 600 images from NASA, ESA and JAXA space missions. With these images, there are detailed captions including technical data from live astronomical information from Wolfram|Alpha®.

Additionally, the app operates in three different languages, English, German, and Japanese so it can be used with bilingual and foreign students.


This app relates to the Alberta Science Program of Studies Grade 6 Topic C, 'Sky Science', with emphasis on Science Inquiry. According to 6–7 students will "Observe, describe and interpret the movement of objects in the sky; and identify pattern and order in these movements". If you'd like to view these outcomes for yourself, follow this link: https://education.alberta.ca/media/654825/elemsci.pdf

https://itunes.apple.com/app/solar-system-for-ipad/id406795422?ls=1&mt=8


Below are images and screenshots pertinent to the app. Below these, is an external video of the app used in action.

The Solar System app for the iPad


Every Circuit is an app that will allow students to gain an understanding of how electronic circuits work. They do this by building any circuit they can imagine, tap the play button, and watch dynamic voltage, current, and charge animations. This gives them insight into circuit operation like no equation does. While simulation is running, students can adjust circuit parameters and the circuit responds to these actions in real time. In other words, this app is incredibly interactive and this will highly engage students.

EveryCircuit is free to download and use. There is an option to purchase the Full Version of EveryCircuit that adds access to thousands of community circuits, large workspace area, cloud storage, and sync between your devices and is available through a one time in-app purchase for $14.99. However, these in-app purchases are well worth the money because it runs a custom-built simulation engine optimized for interactive mobile use, serious numerical methods, and realistic device models. Furthermore, with updates on the way, there is a growing library of components to give students freedom to design any analog or digital circuit. The beauty of the app is that it combines mobility with simplicity, innovation, and power.


Every Circuit has a cloud community to store circuits on cloud and access them from any mobile devices. Furthermore, students can explore public community circuits and share their own designs.

These are the terms of use and privacy policy for Every Circuit:

http://www.everycircuit.com/privacypolicy.html
http://www.everycircuit.com/termsofuse.html

The app features thousands of public community circuits; animations of voltage waveforms and current flows; animations of capacitor charges; analog control knob adjusts circuit parameters; automatic wire routing; oscilloscope with I-V curves; single play/pause button controls simulation; saving and loading of circuit schematic; mobile simulation engine built from ground-up; shake the phone to kick-start oscillators; intuitive user interface; no ads.



This app relates to the Alberta Science Program of Studies Grade 5 Topic B, 'Mechanisms Using Electricity', with emphasis on Problem Solving through Technology. According to 5-6 students will "Construct simple circuits, and apply an understanding of circuits to the construction and control of motorized devices". If you'd like to view these outcomes for yourself, follow this link: https://education.alberta.ca/media/654825/elemsci.pdf


https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/everycircuit/id797157761?mt=8


Below are images and screenshots pertinent to the app. Below these, is an external video of the app used in action.

EveryCircuit
Click here or the above title to be directed to the Alberta Program of Studies for K-6 Science
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Challenges of m-Learning

-Negative aspects of mobile learning Cognitive, social, and physical challenges must be surmounted when mobile devices are incorporated into children’s learning. Disadvantages include: the potential for distraction or unethical behavior; physical health concerns; and data privacy issues.


-Cultural norms and attitudes Though many experts believe that mobile devices have significant potential to transform children’s learning, parents and teachers apparently are not yet convinced. A 2008 study done by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center in collaboration with Common Sense Media found that most teachers see cell phones as distractions and feel that they have no place in school.


-No mobile theory of learning Currently, no widely accepted learning theory for mobile technologies has been established, hampering the effective assessment, pedagogy, and design of new applications for learning.


-Differentiated access and technology Wide diversity among mobile technologies represents a challenge for teachers and learners who wish to accelerate academic outcomes as well as the producers who seek to facilitate such learning.


-Limiting physical attributes Poorly designed mobile technologies adversely affect usability and can distract children from learning goals. Physical aspects of mobile technologies that may prevent an optimal learning experience include: restricted text entry, small screen size, and limited battery life.


mobl21,. (2015). Mobile Learning Basics. Retrieved 26 November 2015, from http://www.mobl21.com/Basics_Of_Mobile_Learning.pdf


There are, understandably, some concerns about mobile devices in the classroom. The biggest is that they distract from schoolwork. Then again, distractions are as old as the ages — we’ve just progressed from daydreaming and passing notes. Experts say the answer isn’t to ban these devices altogether, or to postpone forming a policy on them, but to take advantage of their ability to engage students in a classroom setting.


Edutopia,. (2015). Mobile Devices for Learning - What You Need to Know. Retrieved 26 November 2015, from http://www.edutopia.org/pdfs/guides/edutopia-mobile-learning-guide.pdf

Additional m-Learning Resources

Below are a collection of readings and articles that supplement the understanding of mLearning:


http://www.teachthought.com/uncategorized/25-essential-apps-for-mobile-learning/

http://www.elearningguild.com/mLearnCon/content/3800/mlearncon-2015--mobile-learning-conference--expo--home/

http://info.shiftelearning.com/blog/difference-between-elearning-and-mlearning

http://mlearning.hcmup.edu.vn/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-learning


These readings are pertinent to the trend of mLearning in schools and I feel are very useful in the realm of academia.



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Below are sites with excellent compilations of apps that supplement and facilitate mLearning in the elementary classroom:


http://bestonlineuniversities.com/favorite-mobile-learning-apps/

http://www.edudemic.com/the-90-best-ios-apps-for-mobile-learning/

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/01/18-great-science-apps-for-ipad.html

http://www.slideshare.net/brittgow/mobile-learning-apps-for-science

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/20-awesome-byod-mobile-apps-vicki-davis

http://www.teachthought.com/uncategorized/25-essential-apps-for-mobile-learning/


There are numerous sites which contain compilations of mLearning applications, Above are the best sites I came across for these lists because the apps are accompanied by a thorough description as to why they're good for the purposes they're ascribed for.

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