Martin Luther

The man that triggered change

Brief Biography

Martin Luther became a monk after he said he would if God saved him from a thunderstorm. He saw that the Church was very corrupt and worldly so he took action. He made 95 thesis or arguments against the Church's indulgences and claimed that one is saved only through faith. This caused him to get excommunicated from the Church but he gained many supporters and they founded a Church on his name, Lutheranism.

Castiglione Requirements

1. Martin Luther met Castiglione requirements or was a well-rounded Renaissance man because he was very intelligent, he went to various schools as a child studying rhetoric, grammar, and logic. He later went to the University of Erfurt where he received a Master of Arts degree. He also had social accomplishments. He gained followers because he could communicate so well with the peasants and also with the hierarchy of the Church. Luther also excelled in the arts by publishing the 95 thesis and his translation of the New Testament, which is just to name a few. Martin also managed to balance his physical body by his fasting and he would also pray for his spiritual self so that God would forgive his of all his sins.

Places he Lived

2. Martin Luther was born in Eisleben, Germany but later moved to Mansfield shortly after being born in an attempt to better the family's financial situation he eventually went to Erfurt to attend their university, which was one of the best at the time.

Whom he Worked for

3. Martin Luther worked for the Church first as a monk but he later became a priest. At one point Martin also was a professor at the Wittenberg University for about 5 years.

Facts

  • Martin Luther was born into a mining
  • Martin also married an ex-nun which he helped escape the nunnery in an empty fish barrel, and took refuge in Wittenberg.

Citations

"Martin Luther Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television. Web. 24 Apr. 2015.

"Martin Luther and the 95 Theses." History.com. A&E Television Networks. Web. 24 Apr. 2015. <http://www.history.com/topics/martin-luther-and-the-95-theses>.