Samuel Adams

By: Jazer Maldonado and Zach Sly

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Birth

Samuel Adams was born in Boston in the British colony of Massachusetts on September 27, 1722.
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Religious Beiefs

Adams's parents were strict Puritans and members of the Old South Congregational Church. Adams was proud of his Puritan heritage, and emphasized Puritan values, especially in his political career.
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Education

The younger Samuel Adams attended Boston Latin School and then entered Harvard College in 1736.
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Views

Like his father, Adam's political views were oriented toward colonial rights.
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Debts

Samuel Adams inherited his father's debt that he obtained when his father's land bank was shut down by the government.
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Career Choices

After leaving college, Adams originally wanted to become a lawyer, but after a lot of thought, he decided to go into business.
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First Business Endeavor

He worked at Thomas Cushing's counting house, but the job only lasted a few months because Cushing felt that Adams was too preoccupied with politics to become a good merchant.
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Lack of Motivation

Adams' lack of business instincts were confirmed: he loaned half of this money to a friend, which was never repaid, and lost the other half.
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Becoming a Maltster

After Adams had lost his money, his father made him a partner in the family's malthouse, which was next to the family home on Purchase Street.
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Actual Job

Adams has often been described as a brewer, but evidence suggests that Adams worked as a maltster.
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Taking Over the Family

When Deacon Adams died in 1748, Adams was given the responsibility of managing the family's affairs.
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Marriage

In October 1749, he married Elizabeth Checkley, his pastor's daughter.
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Children

Elizabeth gave birth to six children over the next seven years, but only two, Samuel and Hannah, would live to adulthood.
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Death of his First Wife

In July 1757, Elizabeth died soon after giving birth to a stillborn son.
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Remarriage

Adams remarried Elizabeth Wells, but had no other children.
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First Political Postition

Adams was elected to his first political office in 1747, serving as one of the clerks of the Boston market
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Political Views

Adams was one of the first colonial leaders to argue that mankind possessed certain natural right that governments could not violate.
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Opposing Parliament

Adams urged colonists to keep up the boycott of British goods, arguing that paying even one small tax allowed Parliament to establish the precedent of taxing the colonies, but the boycott failed.
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Tea Party

Adams took a leading role in the events that led up to the famous Boston Tea Party of December 16, 1773.
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Death

Adams died on October 2, 1803, in his hometown of Boston.