The Battle of Fort Fisher

By brandon

The Battle of Fort Fisher

When President Abraham Lincoln declared a blockade of Southern ports in 1861, Rebel engineers began construction on a fortress at the mouth of New Inlet, which provided access to Wilmington. Fort Fisher was constructed of timber and sand, and posed a formidable challenge for the Yankees. The walls were more than 20 feet high and bristled with large cannon. Land mines and palisades made from sharpened logs created even more obstacles for potential attackers.

The Second Battle of Fort Fisher

During this time, Hoke succeeded in slipping around 400 men around Terry's troops to reinforce the garrison. As the bombardment wound down, a naval force of 2,000 sailors and marines attacked the fort's seaward wall near a feature known as the "Pulpit." Led by Lieutenant Commander Kidder Breese, this attack was repulsed with heavy casualties. While a failure, Breese's assault drew Confederate defenders away from the fort's river gate where Brigadier General Adelbert Ames' division was preparing to advance. Sending his first brigade forward, Ames' men cut through the abatis and palisades.