Charcoal

by: tierza

RESPECT

PLEASE respect while i present this. i do not do it for nothing....its to educate you. I spent a total of 4 study halls to do this for 5th graders!!! I take my time for this so please respect...

ENJOY!!!

The History Of Charcoal

The dramatic, strong markings left by charcoal appear in the earliest primitive cave paintings of early humans, which are believed to have been drawn with charcoal created from burnt sticks. Currently, three kinds of charcoals are used in art to make a desired shading and tone. Charcoal pencils consist of compressed charcoal powder and a gum binder, which produces a fine, sharp line while vine charcoal provides a smooth, light softer line.

The Uses of Charcoal Are

1. De-skunk pets. A handful rubbed on Fido's coat neutralizes the lingering odor. 2. Hide stains on paving. Absorbs wet paint spatters on cement by sprinkling ash directly on the spot; it blends in with a scuff of his boot, 3. Enrich compost. Before the organic compound get applied to soil, enhance its nutrients by sprinkling in a few ashes, . Adding too much, though, ruins the mix. 4. Block garden pests. Spread evenly around garden beds, ash repels slugs and snails. 5. Melt ice. It adds traction and de-ices without hurting soil or concrete underneath. 6. Control pond algae. One tablespoon per 1,000 gallons adds enough potassiumm to strengthen other aquatic plants that compete with algae, slowing its growth, 7. Pump up tomatoes. For the calcium-loving plants, 1/4 cup right in the hole when planting,

More Info

The dramatic, rich markings left by charcoal appear in the earliest primitive cave painting of early humans, which are believed to have been drawn with the charcoal created from burnt sticks. Currently, three kinds of charcoals are used in art. Powered charcoal, compressed charcoal and vine charcoal. In its powdered form, charcoal is used to achieve a desired shading and tone. Charcoal pencils consist of compressed charcoal powder and a gum binder, which produces a fine, sharp line, while vine charcoal provides a smooth, softer line. Charcoal is sometimes viewed as a preliminary medium for sketching or drawing before painting.

Able to produce lines with either a soft or strong quality, charcoal is rather versatile, allowing the artist to approach texture, shading and tone with ease. Charcoal is easy to apply and does not adhere to the grooved surfaces of canvases, giving artists the freedom to create smooth drawings that are easily corrected. However, without a fixative, charcoal illustrations are vulnerable to smudges, which could explain why so many artists use it as a preliminary tool. Throughout the Renaissance, most artists used charcoal to prepare their panel paintings or fresco murals, and many used charcoal in their drawing studies. However, some masters used charcoal alone or with chalks and ink to create stunning masterpieces.