7 Principles of the Constitution

By: Marisa Kiser

Popular Sovereignty

In the end, the power is with the people of the United States because the people elect who runs the government and the people bring the country's problems to the governments attention


A woman is electing who she wants to be in office.



Preamble of the Constitution: "We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote to the general welfare, and secure all blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this constitution for the United States of America."

Republicanism

The people of the United States use their power by electing leaders into office, and if they end up disagreeing with decisions being made by that leader then (with enough support and hard work) the leader can be overthrown and somebody else can be elected into office.


In this picture a group of people are protesting against decisions that their government has made and are trying to get their point across by "making their voices heard"


Article IV Section 1: "Full faith and credit shall be given in each state to the public arts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other state. And the congress may by general laws prescribe the manner in which such acts, records, and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof."

Federalism

The power is divided between the national government and the state government. Some power is shared, like the power to tax people.


A state government can decide state laws for their own state, while the national government can pass laws regarding the whole country; however, both governments share the power to tax the people.


Article 1 Section 8: "The congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United States."

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Separation of Powers

The power in the national government is divided into three different branches: Legislative, Executive, and the Judicial.


The national government is divided into three parts so that no government is too powerful.


Article 1: "All legislative powers herein shall be vested in a congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives"


Article II: "The executive power shall be vested in a president of the United States of America. He shall hold his office during the Term of four years, and, together with the Vice President, be elected for the same term"


Article III: "The judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme court, and in such inferior courts as the congress may from time to time ordain and establish."

Checks and Balances

Each branch of government has the power to check up on the other two branches so the government is not too powerful.


The president can veto a bill, but when the bill gets sent back to congress, with a 2/3 vote from congress, the bill can be passed.


Article I: "The congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excise shall be uniform throughout the United States"

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Limited Government

The governments power is limited and in order to do most things it needs to have the acceptance of the people of the United States. The national government has special powers that the states government do not have the power to do.


The president can't just automatically come up with a law and put it into action. The people of the United States have to agree with it and it would have to go through all the branches of government first.


Article 1 Section 10: "No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any title of nobility."

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Individual Rights

Every citizen of the United States is granted personal freedoms which include: the right to vote, the right to bear arms, etc.


If citizens want to protest against something, as shown in the picture, they have the right to.


Article 1 Section 9: "The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the congress prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person,"

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