Cryptosporidiosis

By: Dominic Ehrman

What is it

This disease is a water and food born disease that is transmitted by either animals or other humans. Cryptosporidium is the parasite that lives in the humans or the animals intestine. This disease can hurt very severely.
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Causes

Some causes of this disease are feces, contaminated water, juices, and pretty much all types of liquids. Some other causes are contaminated food and by touching something contaminated. This disease can also be transmitted by dirty or even clean water. You could also get it from eating uncooked contaminated food. You could also get it from touching you hand to you mouth.

Syptoms

Not all of the symptoms are hurtful but some do make a difference. Some of the symptoms are vomiting, watery diarrhea, stomach cramps, weight loss, and by far the worst skin damage.. They may show or may not. IF they do show it may last two-three weeks. If it doesn't show it may come and go for one-two months. If it does happen for a while it is painful. (Skin Damage On Right)

Locations

The locations where this could be is everywhere. This will be more where the water is contaminated but it may go everywhere.There is cases in america over 483,000 every year.
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Organs/Organ Systems

Some of the organs that are hurt are stomach, liver, and lungs. These are all hurt in different ways.The stomach and liver is hurt because of vomiting and weight loss. The lungs are hurt because when you loss the weight it would make it harder to breath because all the extra skin would collapse and stop you from breathing.

Vaccine

The only vaccine is flip flop the disease. What I mean is to eat more food. Drink clean water. And go to the bathroom more.

Prevention

To prevent this disease you should limit ponds and swimming events. You should also limit activities that include water maybe something like fishing. when doing an activity you should drink filtered water.

Statistics

There is a lot of statistics but I am only going to tell the four most important. In America there is over 780,000 cases of this disease every year. Isn't that terrifying. In one whole year a summer camp had two cases both in three months. At a fire station in India a percentage of the workers had sines of Crypto. In 1993 in April 403,000 outbreaks occurred. In 1995 just after a doctors place had just closed a man was sighted with Crypto and soon after that he died from all the vomiting that occurred.

Most risk factors

People that a at most risk to get this disease are those to are exposed to contaminated water. Those who are children preferably wearing diapers and that attend care centers. The people that are taking care of animals. The most likely hikers, bikers, cavers, or runners drinking unfiltered water. International travelers especially those traveling to develop countries. Swimmers who stay in shallow water like pools, ponds and lake.

History

Cryptospordium was first recognized as a disease in 1976. The history of this disease is that the CDC used over $10 million to protect only 400 employees. The CDC also used netting to catch any mosquitoes the may have had the disease in them. 155 mammal species have bean reported of being able to get Cryptospordium.

Works Cited


Cryptosporidium. Digital image. CDC. CDC. Web. 15 Dec. 2014.

"Cryptosporidium Infection." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic. Web. 02 Dec. 2014.

Cryptosporidium Syptoms. Digital image. Web. 18 Dec. 2014.

"Giardia Infection (giardiasis)." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic, 14 Nov. 2012. Web. 05 Dec. 2014.

"Infection – General Public." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 02 Nov. 2010. Web. 04 Dec. 2014.

"Naegleria Infection." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic, 04 Aug. 2012. Web. 04 Dec. 2014.

Cryptosporidium. Digital image. CDC. CDC. Web. 15 Dec. 2014.

"Cryptosporidium Infection." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic. Web. 02 Dec. 2014.

Cryptosporidium Syptoms. Digital image. Web. 18 Dec. 2014.

"Giardia Infection (giardiasis)." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic, 14 Nov. 2012. Web. 05 Dec. 2014.

"Infection – General Public." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 02 Nov. 2010. Web. 04 Dec. 2014.

"Naegleria Infection." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic, 04 Aug. 2012. Web. 04 Dec. 2014.