Battle of Long Island

By Nate Burns

Introduction

The American Revolution lasted from 1775 until 1783. The first shots were fired at Lexington, Massachusetts. The colonists were divided between Patriots and Loyalists. Before the United States and Great Britain signed the Treaty of Paris officially ending the war, there were many battles fought. One of the battles that was important during the struggle for American independence was the Battle of Long Island. General Howe was the leader who led his troops to victory.

About The Battle

The Battle of Long Island started August 27, 1776 and it took place in New York state. After the British evacuated Boston in March, the British General Lord Howe moved to occupy New York City under the protection of the British fleet.

General Howe

General Howe lead his troops to victory in the Battle of Long Island. Howe might have captured Washington's entire force on Long Island at this point, but instead he elected to lay siege.

Interesting Facts

Sullivan's men fought bravely but were cut down by Hessian artillery and bayonets. On August 26 General Howe planned to lead 10,000 men through the pass on the evening to attack the Americans on Brooklyn Heights from the rear.

Conclusion

After the British evacuated Boston in March, the British general Lord Howe moved to occupy New York City under the protection of the British fleet. Discussing their next step Major General Henery Clinton suggested moving through Jamaica pass at night with the goal of surprising and crushing the American. The defeat at Long Island cost Washington (northern Manhatten) and one on Long Island.

Resources

MilitaryHistory.com