Principles of Composition and Color

Unit 7

PROJECT 1: SCALE AND PROPORTION USING COLOR CHORDING

GOAL: Construct a design that creates a sequential (following in a logical order) system of color.



  • Hues can be colors that progress from one hue to another ( blue, blue-green, green) AND/OR
  • Color shapes that progress in terms of value shift (light to dark or variations of intensity).



On one (1) piece of bristol white paper arrange a minimum of 20 shapes of the following: You do not have to use all shapes.


  • circles you paint yourself and cut
  • triangles you paint yourself and cut
  • squares you paint yourself and cut

  1. Color choices should be used to create a sense/feeling of motion/flow.


Materials


  • Ruler
  • Paper Cutter
  • Pencil for drawing
  • Paint (primary colors, using white to lighten and black to darken)
  • Mix primary colors to make secondary and tertiary colors


PROJECT 2: CONTRASTING COLORS ALL PIXELED UP

GOAL: Create a self pixelated portrait trying to capture a combination of the list below . If your photo does not work with using more than 1 combination, that is okay.


  • SIMULTANEOUS CONTRAST (blue & orange next to each other)
  • CONTRAST OF SATURATION (brightness or purity of colors against dulled color)
  • VALUE CONTRAST (light and dark)



  1. On one piece of white bristol paper

  • arrange SQUARES of paper you paint yourself to create a pixelated looking portrait.
  • Use Photoshop to pixelate a headshot of yourself.
  • Use a higher contrast so that the differences between colors show up better.
  • Adjust the contrast, brightness, and color settings for a brighter and more colorful pixelated image.

  1. The squares cannot
    1. overlap

  1. Background must not be left white.


How to Use Photoshop


  1. Open up your picture.
  2. Now go to Filter> Pixelate Mosaic. (If using Elements, this step may be different)
  • It will allow you to choose the cell size (the cell size is just the size of the blocks). For this tutorial, you want the image to have large blocks while still having the image or photo outline.
  • You can always make it smaller or larger. You should decide what looks best.
  • You should still be able to tell it is a portrait.
  1. Auto Color can give you more variances in color (Not sure where this is in Elements)
  2. You can re-adjust vibrance, hue, saturation and exposure if needed.
  3. EXPERIMENT!!!! It's good to make mistakes... PLEASE make mistakes!!!!!
  4. File, Save As
  5. .jpg into your folder in Anala


AFTER PHOTOSHOP


  1. Print the photo out at the Library copier.
  2. You will follow the same color blocks as the photo.
  3. Using paint, try to match the color on the print out and paint individual squares to make up your portrait.
  4. When dried, glue down the squares onto Bristol board. Do not go over border.



Materials


  • Pencil for drawing
  • Paint (primary colors, using white to lighten and black to darken)
  • Mix primary colors to make secondary and tertiary colors


PROJECT 3: SUPERIMPOSE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE SHAPES

GOAL: Planned correspondence between positive and negative shapes. Use "Cold-Warm" contrast by using the temperature of colors to create contrast. (Red & Green, Blue & Orange, Yellow & Purple)


Use the examples provided as a guide.


  1. On one (1) piece of bristol white paper make an abstract design composed of superimposed geometric shapes.
  2. You can draw many individual shapes on separate pieces of tracing paper, overlap them to form a unified design.
  3. Then make a final copy of the previously combined effect on bristol paper.
  4. Assign colors according to a positive and negative motif.
  5. This should have a flat, non-spatial pattern and emphasizes transparency.


Materials


  • Pencil for drawing
  • Paint (primary colors, using white to lighten and black to darken)
  • Mix primary colors to make secondary and tertiary colors

WHAT I LOOK FOR


  • Does the student recognize the elements of composition in a work of art?
  • Can the student execute works of art that demonstrate the use of the elements of composition?
  • Neatness, Craftsmanship and classroom behavior.