Water the cycle of life

water cycle

The water cycle of life

The water cycle has many types of stages. Step 1The sun happens to be the driving force of the water cycle. It heats up the water in seas, rivers, lakes and glaciers, which evaporates and rises up in the atmosphere. Water is also evaporated through plants and soil through a process called transpiration. This evaporated water is in the form of water vapor, which cannot be seen with naked eyes.Step 2This water vapor then comes in contact with air currents, which take it higher into the atmosphere. After reaching cooler temperatures, the water vapor condenses to form clouds, which contain millions of tiny droplets of water.Step 3These clouds move all round the globe and grow in size collecting more water vapor on their way. When it becomes too heavy for the clouds to hold anymore water vapor, they burst and the droplets of water fall back on earth in the form of rain. If the atmosphere is cold enough, the form of precipitation changes from rain to snow and sleet. Step 4In the last step, rain or melted snow flows back into water bodies like rivers, lakes, and streams. Rainwater is also soaked up by the soil, through a process called infiltration. Some of the water also runs off the surface or seeps in the ground, which may later be seen as groundwater or freshwater springs. Eventually the water reaches the oceans, which are the largest water bodies and the biggest source of water vapor.

Types of precipitation

In meteorology, precipitation (also known as one of the classes of hydrometeors, which are atmospheric water phenomena) is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapour that falls under gravity.[1] The main forms of precipitation include drizzle (sometimes called mist - especially "Scotch mist"), rain, sleet, snow, graupel and hail. Precipitation occurs when a local portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapour, so that the water condenses and "precipitates". Thus, fog and mist (except when the terms are used to mean "drizzle") are not precipitation but suspensions, because the water vapour does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapour to the air. Generally, precipitation will fall to the surface; an exception is Virga which evaporates before reaching the surface. Precipitation forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud. Rain drops range in size from oblate, pancake-like shapes for larger drops, to small spheres for smaller drops. Unlike raindrops, snowflakes grow in a variety of different shapes and patterns, determined by the temperature and humidity characteristics of the air the snowflake moves through on its way to the ground. While snow and ice pellets require temperatures close to the ground to be near or below freezing, hail can occur during much warmer temperature regimes due to the process of its formation.

what can happen

water cycle


Evaporation is the process by which water changes from a liquid to a gas or vapor. Evaporation is the primary pathway that water moves from the liquid state back into the water cycle as atmospheric water vapor. Studies have shown that the oceans, seas, lakes, and rivers provide nearly 90 percent of the moisture in the atmosphere via evaporation, with the remaining 10 percent being contributed by plant transpiration.A very small amount of water vapor enters the atmosphere through sublimation, the process by which water changes from a solid (ice or snow) to a gas, bypassing the liquid phase. This often happens in the Rocky Mountains as dry and warm Chinook winds blow in from the Pacific in late winter and early spring. When a Chinook takes effect local temperatures rise dramatically in a matter of hours


Condensation is the process by which water vapor in the air is changed into liquid water. Condensation is crucial to the water cycle because it is responsible for the formation of clouds. These clouds may produce precipitation, which is the primary route for water to return to the Earth's surface within the water cycle. Condensation is the opposite of evaporation.You don't have to look at something as far away as a cloud to notice condensation, though. Condensation is responsible for ground-level fog, for your glasses fogging up when you go from a cold room to the outdoors on a hot, humid day, for the water that drips off the outside of your glass of iced tea, and for the water on the inside of the windows in your home on a cold day
The Water Cycle Rap

One earth don't waste water

People waste water every day!

Everyday people have lots of water bottles and they waste the water. Some people pour out the water instead of drinking all the water.I saw a man pour out all the water that was trrible.