Homeostasis

And The Digestive System

Big image

Homeostasis

The tendency toward a relatively stable equilibrium between interdependent elements, especially as maintained by physiological processes. Homeostasis controlls our temprature for example.

Digestion


Digestion is the process a body uses to turn food into a usable source of energy. For humans and most mammals, digestion starts in the mouth, where enzymes that aid in digestion are released in saliva and help prepare food for further digestion by the stomach and intestines. Acids in the stomach break down complex carbohydrates, such as starches, and smaller particles are absorbed into the bloodstream. The unabsorbed particles then move to the small intestine, where they are further broken down and either absorbed by the intestinal wall to immediately be used as energy or to be stored as energy reserves (fat). What is left is moved to the large intestine for the final stages of absorption and digestion, and the unusable waste is expelled from the body as excrement.

https://docs.google.com/a/ocps.net/document/d/12Aej7-1JschQU9Lie9iZflbhajeQg9JMyrUdXcDsoQg/edit?usp=sharing

Big image

Systems that work with the Digestive System in the process of Homeostasis

THE IMPORTANCE OF KNOWING WHAT TO EAT AND WHAT NOT TO EAT

Some foods are good for us and some are not as good for us, for example the burger. Hamburgers and Cheese burgers are not good for you or your digestive system because the contain fat. Trans fat, which is naturally found in meat, is known to raise cholesterol levels and has been linked to heart disease; however, the FDA currently allows a food to be labeled trans fat-free if it has less than half a gram. While most fast-food chains get under this .5 limit, their burgers still contain the unhealthy fat — and restaurant varieties can have up to 2.5 grams. Plus, some food chains pack almost 50 grams of fat into each burger. That’s well over the healthy range, which is between 18 to 31 grams per day, depending on your calorie intake. The physical and chemical properties of fats affect the way they are processed in your stomach and intestine. Unlike proteins and carbohydrates, which mix well within the aqueous environment of your gastrointestinal tract, fats are incompatible with water and tend to rise and float at the top of your stomach's contents.http://www.everydayhealth.com/news/unhealthy-things-lurking-in-your-burger/ http://www.livestrong.com/article/467828-does-fat-slow-digestion/