A preventable Infectious disease!

What is Rabies?

Rabies is a preventable viral disease of mammals most often transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal.The vast majority of rabies cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) each year occur in wild animals like raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes.

Signs and Symptoms

The first symptoms of rabies may be very similar to those of the flu including general weakness or discomfort, fever, or headache. These symptoms may last for days. There may be also discomfort or a prickling or itching sensation at the site of bite, progressing within days to symptoms of cerebral dysfunction, anxiety, confusion, agitation. As the disease progresses, the person may experience delirium, abnormal behavior, hallucinations, and insomnia.

How is rabies transmitted?

Transmission of rabies virus usually begins when infected saliva of a host is passed to an uninfected animal. The most common mode of rabies virus transmission is through the bite and virus-containing saliva of an infected host. Though transmission has been rarely documented via other routes such as contamination of mucous membranes, aerosol transmission, and corneal and organ transplantations.

Prevention and Treatment


Visit your veterinarian with your pet on a regular basis and keep rabies vaccinations up-to-date for all cats, ferrets, and dogs.

Maintain control of your pets by keeping cats and ferrets indoors and keeping dogs under direct supervision.

Spay or neuter your pets to help reduce the number of unwanted pets that may not be properly cared for or vaccinated regularly.

Call animal control to remove all stray animals from your neighborhood since these animals may be unvaccinated or ill.


Rabies in humans is 100% preventable through prompt appropriate medical care.

Rabid Animals

Rabies is a virus that affects the nervous system of warm-blooded animals, including humans. This virus is typically spread via the saliva of infected animals through bite wounds or by saliva or infected tissue that contacts open wounds and the oral cavity.