Protect the Sea Otter

North America's Endangered Animals

Time to be Hero's!

The Sea Otter is currently on the endangered species list. Honestly, who would want to hurt these creatures? Hunters KILL these animals for their fur! Why would you do that? Just to get some more money. People nearly killed off the sea otter population just to make money. This isn't right and we all know that.
Milo and Tanu Holding Paws

How the Sea Otter adapted

The sea otter adapted to its environment in many ways. For example, for protection they stay in groups. Whenever they are at the surface they float on their backs to trick any predators that are near by. Since they are in the water they are ready to flee from predators right when they notice them. Also because they are always on the lookout for food, they had to find easier ways to feed on creatures. For this this used a rock.


More Information: Another reason for their decline in population is malnutrition, disease and parasites. Scientist have found that even though sea otters eat a lot, most of what they intake does not provide enough nutrients for their bodies. Disease and Parasites are found in what they eat and eventually kill them.


What is being done to protect them: In 1911 there was the International Seal Fur Treaty. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to find ways to keep the otters safe. Later on came the Endangered Species Act.


Many people and Scientist are trying to save the sea otter, but do you have the heart to help too?


(Meadows) (Sea Otter)

Photo Credit

Top:

  • By Mike Baird on Flikr


Middle (left to right):

  1. By Alan Wolf on Flickr
  2. By Franco Folini on Flickr
  3. By Uko Ki on Flickr


Video:

  • Vancouver Aquarium (Youtube)

Works Cited

  • Folini, Franco. acific sand crab (Emerita analoga). 2011. Photograph. Flikr, San

Gregorio, California, US. Web. 11 Apr 2013.

<http://www.flickr.com/photos/livenature/5785411394/>.

(Folini)

  • Meadows, Robin. "Zoo Goer California Sea Otter Adrift."Smithsonian. Smithsonian

National Zoological Park, n.d. Web. 14-18 March 2013.

<http://nationalzoo.si.edu/Publications/ZooGoer/2008/2/Sea_otters.cfm>.

(Meadows)

  • . North American Mammals. Smithsonian. Web. 12-13 March 2013.

<http://www.mnh.si.edu/mna/image_info.cfm?species_id=85>.

(".")

  • Sea Otter. 2010. Photograph. FlickrWeb. 10 Apr 2013.

<http://www.flickr.com/photos/Uko Ki/4843458556/>.

  • "Sea Otter." National Geographic. National Geographic, n.d. Web. 12-13 March 2013.

<http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/sea-otter/?

sourse=A-to-Z>.

(Sea Otter)

  • Sea Otter preening itself in Morro Bay, CA sea-otter-morro-bay_13. 2007. Photograph.

Flickr, Morro Bay, CA. Web. 10 Apr 2013.

<http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikebaird/398077070/>.

(Baird)

  • Wolf, Alan. Here I am... 2007. Photograph. Flickr, Vancouver Aquarium. Web. 11 Apr

2013. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/alumroot/734839642/>.

(Wolf)