Exposure Triangle

Lindsay Borer

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Exposure Triangle

The exposure triangle includes the three things you need to keep in mind when trying to take a good picture; aperture, ISO, and shutter speed. All three of these work together to make a good picture. Sometimes when you adjust one thing you will have to adjust all three.
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Aperture

Aperture is used to adjust the depth of field. A low aperture of f/1.4 has a big opening, but a shallower depth of field. A high aperture of f/16 has a very small opening, but a wider depth of field. You would use a low aperture when taking pictures of birds or just one subject. And you use a high aperture when you are taking photographs of landscape. Aperture is measured F stops, and a low F stop has a bigger opening, and a high F stop has a smaller opening.
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ISO

ISO is the measure of light sensitivity in your photos. If you have a low ISO of 100 your photo is less sensitive to light. If you have a high ISO of 3200 your photo is very sensitive to light. High ISO's result in noise on your picture. Noise is when the photo has a grainy look to it, just like the image above. If it is a sunny day outside and there is a lot of natural light, then you would use a low ISO of 100. If it was a dark day outside with not very much natural light you would have to use a higher ISO of 1600 or 3200 to let in more light.
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Shutter Speed

Shutter speed is how long your shutter is open, and how long it lets light in. It is measured in seconds or fractions of a second. You would use a high shutter speed of 1/1000 to photograph a person running. You would use a slow shutter speed of 1/8 if you were photographing someone writing with light.
Understanding Exposure: The Exposure Triangle with Mark Wallace