Public Health in the 21st Century

INFORM, INFORM, INFORM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Introduction

I’m going to speaking to you today about how to create a global community in the 21st century, specifically building a healthier community. Have you ever heard that saying, it takes a village to raise a child. It’s true right, but doesn’t take that same village to support each adult and look after the elderly. How often are we thinking of the collective health of our societies? From a community level, all the way up to a national scale, high social participation has shown to lead to policies that protect health and prolong life. I’m only covering three points, keep in mind there are thousands of issues that need to be resolved in the public health field.

1. We must improve access to relevant health information.

2. We must create social networks that will benefit our society in the realm of mental health.

3. We must be create well organized, connected groups that are more effective in lobbying for health issues.

Participation: Identify the issues, get local leaders, find the resources: Organizations or the government, reach out to everyone.

Kemp, Donna R. Mental Health in America: A Reference Handbook. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2007. Pages 193, 204, Print.

Donna Kemp as a Political Science Professor conveys the idea that we aren’t doing enough for the mentally ill. She gives many statistics that support her claim like, “In any given year about 54 million Americans have a mental disorder, however only 8 million seek treatment (Kemp, 204), and, “One in five children have a diagnosable mental, emotional, or behavior disorder, however 70% of those children don’t receive any mental health services (Kemp,193). 95% of the nation’s rural areas don’t have the ability to see a psychiatrist and 68% can’t see a psychologist . A Public Health goal in mental health is to show the impact of stress and how we can cope better with it. She believes with people living longer, there is an increased need to address mental health. She says that If there is preventive interventions, there is a decrease risk of onset or delay of disorders. These preventive interventions are becoming more aware of the importance of mental health and not creating stigmas.

Maurice, J. M., and Sheila Davey. State of the World's Vaccines and Immunization. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2009. State of the World's Vaccination. UNICEF. Page 6. Web.

Unicef provides worldwide relief to issues like water, vaccines, and water shortages. They speak of keeping people healthy by advocating for immunization programs with strong leadership. “With 85% of the world’s population – account for only 12% of global spending on health” (UNICEF, 6). They are the people who try to at least make it a little more fair for those who can’t afford healthcare. They say fundraising, volunteering, and going on mission trips is the way we can contribute to the fight against diseases, water, and food.

Piper, Karen Lynnea. The Price of Thirst: Global Water Inequality and the Coming Chaos. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota, 2014. Page 71. Print.

Piper, a postcolonial studies professor at University of Missouri is bringing to light the current and future conflicts of clean water and whether Water will be the new oil in the 21st century. She says that farmers are controlling water banks, and big businesses are controlling which cities sustain water and the countries who need water, don’t get it because they can’t afford it . “Also ground water is being extracted faster than it is being recharged” (Piper, 71). Basically to extract it in certain parts of the country (California), they will have to dig deeper and deeper, which is more expensive to extract and treat. The way we are urbanizing and through climate change, this creates more polluted water. Clean water is becoming a delicacy, much like gas.

"When Every Drop Counts." When Every Drop Counts: Protecting Public Health During Drought Conditions—A Guide for Public Health Professionals (n.d.): n. pag. Public Health Professions. Center for Disease Control. Page 21-25. Web. 17 Feb. 2015.

The Center for Disease Control tries to answer the question, Why care about drought? For us in America they say, the number of dry days is projected to increase, especially in the southwest. Water is a key resource for energy in the United States. They have research suggesting that reduction in water is directly linked to an increase in numerous diseases because of hygiene concerns. When dry heat enters an area cyanobacteria can enter the water and infiltrate and create harmful drinking water. Public health guidance can minimize the effects in drought by developing measures for water conservation, encouraging feasible water practices, noticing aquifers in the ground, and talk about improving infrastructures in areas where the concerns are high. “Droughts can affect food availability, energy, air quality, our mental health, infectious diseases, and cause chronic illness” (CDC, 25).

Rocco, University Of Padua, Italy, Lorenzo, and Marc Suhrcke, University Of East Anglia, United Kingdom. "Is Social Capital Good for Health?" Is Social Capital Good for Health? A European Perspective (n.d.): n. pag. World Health Organization. Page 3. Web. 17 Feb. 2015.

These two professors in Europe who consults with the World Health Organization speaks of when social capital level is high, the distribution of health is better because social capital creates an increased access to relevant health information. When the cost to access important information decreases, the more accurate depiction of what healthcare policies are needed to be intervened. “When the community knows which issues are important, they will lobby more for health boosting public gains” (Rocco, 3). This could happen from being involved in a membership club that advocates for certain health issues. They say that social capital also increases the more informal side of healthcare because we become more caring for our neighbors and friends, this helps them lean on people in times of financial or mental instability.

Public Health in 21st Century

References-Work Cited

PICTURES

1. http://www.jabulani.space/water-will-become-new-oil/

2. http://www.nrdc.org/water/readiness/

3. http://health.mo.gov/training/epi/Responsibility.html

4. http://www.afronline.org/?p=13929#more-13929

5. http://www.gettyimages.in/detail/news-photo/michi-marshall-and-brandon-marshall-attend-speak-up-for-news-photo/492828643

Frumkin, Howard, Lawrence D. Frank, and Richard Jackson. Urban Sprawl and Public Health: Designing, Planning, and Building for Healthy Communities. Washington, DC: Island, 2004. Page 124,169.Print.


Kemp, Donna R. Mental Health in America: A Reference Handbook. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2007. Pages 193, 204, Print.


Maurice, J. M., and Sheila Davey. State of the World's Vaccines and Immunization. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2009. State of the World's Vaccination. UNICEF. Page 6. Web.


Piper, Karen Lynnea. The Price of Thirst: Global Water Inequality and the Coming Chaos. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota, 2014. Page 71. Print.


Rocco, University Of Padua, Italy, Lorenzo, and Marc Suhrcke, University Of East Anglia, United Kingdom. "Is Social Capital Good for Health?" Is Social Capital Good for Health? A European Perspective (n.d.): n. pag. World Health Organization. Page 3. Web. 17 Feb. 2015.

Vaughn, Jacqueline. Environmental Politics: Domestic and Global Dimensions. New York: St. Martin's, 2010. Page 211. Print.