Human Trafficking

Who is to blame?

Human Trafficking is the fastest growing illegal industry in the world behind drugs. Earning over forty four billion dollars a year, trafficking is the modern form of slavery. A common misconception is the deplorability of slavery was wiped out during the 1800s, or the majority at least. Unfortunately, this is wrong. Trafficking is a flourishing industry and it can happen to anyone. However, the vast majority of victims are women, and at least 50% are minors. It is estimated that the number of children trafficked anually is around 1.2 million to possibly 3 million. The number of overall trafficked people in the world today is more than twice the amount of slaves in the Trans Atlantic slave trade - the overall estimated sum is a shocking 27 million people worldwide.
What really happens when someone is trafficked is what we are still finding out. The two main types of trafficking are for labor and for sexual purposes. Although sex trafficking is overall more common, forced labor is becoming common. In the United States, sex trafficking occurs more often than labor trafficking. One frightening statistic is that when one out of three girls leave their home, they are lured into prostituation within 48 hours. (EQ) With human trafficking on the rise, who/what is to blame for the growth and strength of this horrible industry?

Getting help

To get help, call the number given or text us


SMS: 233733 text INFO or HELP

Potential Causes

There are many potential causes for human trafficking, the more popular ones being


  • global recession
  • poverty
  • greed of criminals
  • Some causes conflict with each other, such as how many people think that ads on websites contribute to trafficking, while others strongly believe that restricting ads on websites helps traffickers.


In order to stop human trafficking, we have to find the overall cause. In order to do that, we must look through the victims eyes and walk in their shoes.


Victims


  • Hawaiian sixteen year old Mauri - She was taken advantage of and blackmailed by her pimp. She lived in fear for her family and friends. Mauri is now free, but suffers from post traumatic stress disorder. This example is directly linked to the greed of criminals.
  • Latulo, a young adult from Uganda. He was from a poor family and needed to pay for his collage tuition. Latulo was promised a factory job in Kenya that had good living conditions and fair pay. When he and others arrived, they were enslaved and not allowed to leave. The conditions were horrible, and the mental and physical toll of his ordeal was high. For Latulo, this could be related to global recession/poverty, but he was undeniably taken advantage of like Mauri. Therefore, this is more related towards the greed of criminals.
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Effects of Trafficking

There are many effects of human trafficking. These effects will differ depending on the situation, the victim, and other factors. Common effects of human trafficking are



  • Various psychological disorders due to trauma and lack of emotional care - one example is Mauri from Hawaii
  • Different physical problems due to abuse, the conditions they were in, and how well they were taken care of - many were not taken care of at all
  • Debt due to lawsuits, blackmailing, etc.
  • After being rescued, many victims have trouble being reaccepted into society - they can find it hard to trust others, even those close to them
  • Blame, hate and violence towards ethnic or social groups - some will be stereotypical and blame various groups for trafficking, causing irrational violence and hatred

Final Thoughts

There are too many different scenarios that can occur in human trafficking for there to be one direct cause. However, the one thing all victims have in common is they are trafficked due to their captors or traffickers. Human trafficking is generally caused by the greed of criminals. There is no doubt in my mind that other factors could play a part in trafficking. It could be related to poverty, economic downfall, ads online, etc. These causes vary from victim to victim though. The greed of criminals does not. Therefore, the criminals themselves are at fault for human trafficking.

Bibliography

Works Cited

"The Au Pair and Human Trafficking Connection - Brine Books Publishing." Brine Books Publishing. N.p., 11 Nov. 2013. Web. 17 Dec. 2014.

Blackburn, Marsha, and Carolyn Maloney. "Ads on Websites Contribute to Human Trafficking." Human Trafficking. Ed. Dedria Bryfonski. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2013. Current Controversies. Rpt. from "Letter to Larry Page, Chief Executive Officer of Google." 2012. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

Boyd, Danah. "Restricting Classified Advertising Websites Helps Pimps and Human Traffickers." Human Trafficking. Ed. Dedria Bryfonski. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2013. Current Controversies. Rpt. from "How Censoring Craigslist Helps Pimps, Child Traffickers and Other Abusive Scumbags." The Huffington Post. 2010.Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

Bullard, Becky O. "Where We've Been and How We Can Move Forward in the Fight against Human Trafficking." Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault. CCASA, 10 Jan. 2014. Web. 17 Dec. 2014.

"Global Recession Boosts Child Prostitution and Trafficking." IRIN: Humanitarian News and Analysis. 2009. Rpt. in Human Trafficking. Ed. Dedria Bryfonski. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2013. Current Controversies. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

"Human Trafficking." Network of Victim Assistance. N.p., 2013. Web. 17 Dec. 2014.

"Human Trafficking (with Images, Tweet) · Jwycinski." Storify. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2014.

"Human Trafficking." Human Trafficking. Ed. Christina Fisanick. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2010. Current Controversies. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

"Legislature Passes Several Bills Targeting Human Trafficking - SaintPetersBlog." SaintPetersBlog. N.p., 25 Apr. 2014. Web. 14 Dec. 2014.

Petriliggieri, Francesca. "Poverty Is the Root Cause of Human Trafficking." Human Trafficking. Ed. Dedria Bryfonski. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2013. Current Controversies. Rpt. from "Trafficking in Human Beings and Poverty." Coatnet.com. 2012. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

"Polaris | Combating Human Trafficking and Modern-day Slavery." Polaris | Combating Human Trafficking and Modern-day Slavery. Polaris, 2014. Web. 14 Dec. 2014.

Sabyan, Christian, Emily Smith, and Manav Tanneeru. "The Number: Average Price of Slave Has Decreased." The CNN Freedom Project Ending ModernDay Slavery RSS. CNN, 6 Apr. 2011. Web. 17 Dec. 2014.

Tirman, John. "HUMAN TRAFFICKING AROUND THE WORLD Hidden in Plain Sight By Stephanie Hepburn and Rita J. Simon." Washington Post. The Washington Post, 16 Aug. 2013. Web. 09 Dec. 2014.

"True Accounts | Global Freedom Center : Global Freedom Center." True Accounts | Global Freedom Center : Global Freedom Center. Global Freedom Center, 2013. Web. 08 Dec. 2014.

"The Truth." Standing For Freedom. N.p., 13 Nov. 2013. Web. 15 Dec. 2014.

United Nations Inter-Agency Project on Human Trafficking. "Human Trafficking Is Caused by the Greed of Criminals." Human Trafficking. Ed. Dedria Bryfonski. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2013. Current Controversies. Rpt. from "Human Trafficking: Background on Trafficking Risk Factors." 2012. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

"Victims' Stories." U.S. Department of State. U.S. Department of State, n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2014.