Lady in the Lake

Goddess of the Water

Nimue or Vivienne

Nimue is thought to be related to Mneme, the shortened form of Mnemosyne which comes from Roman and Greek mythology who gave weapons. Vivienne comes from a varient of the widespread water-goddess.

Avalon

Ancient myth has it that Avalon, where the sea met the land, was the meeting place of the dead. The island itself is a place of lakes and rock, with deep meadows and wooded hollows. Where no wind blows and rain, hail, and snow have never been known to fall. Avalon is supposed to be similar to a representation of Heaven.

The Tradition

Lady of the Lake was the foster mother of Sir Lancelot, she raised him beneath the murky waters of her lake. She is most known for the presentation of the sword; Excalibur to King Arthur, because they were constantly worried the monarch would fall into battle. To some extent she stepped into Merlin's role at King Arthur's side, but Merlin's removal contributed to the great monarch's downfall.

Love Life

Merlin had fallen deeply in love with Lady in the Lake, but she did not return this affection. However, she did persuade him to teach her his mystical powers. The lady became Merlin's scribe as well as his lover, so they traveled together. Over the years Vivienne became so powerful that her magical skills outshone Merlin. She imprisoned him in a glass tower with invisible walls. The Lady of the Lake was also associated with Pelleas, one of the knights of the round table. When Pelleas was rejected by Ettard, the women he loved- the Lady took care of him. Her and Pelleas fell in love and were married.
"She refuses to give him her love until he has taught her all his secrets."


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_of_the_Lake

"Water deities were extremely popular with Celtic Society for they controlled the essential essence of life itself."


http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Lady_of_the_Lake.aspx

"The spontaneous movement of springs, rivers and lakes clearly showed the supernatural powers of the goddess within"


http://www.britannia.com/history/biographies/nimue.html

Referring to the "isle of apples," indicating the island was paradisiacal or magical.


http://www.uiweb.uidaho.edu/student_orgs/arthurian_legend/england/sites/avalon.htm