Amphetamine

By: Cheyenne Swinton

Amphetamine

Some types of amphetamines are prescribed by doctors and are legally sold to treat conditions like ADHD or narcolepsy. Others are produced and sold illegally like speed. Amphetamine is not naturally made in the body. It has to be taken.

Stimulant or Depressant

Amphetamines are stimulant drugs, which means they speed up the messages traveling between the brain and the body.

Can be in the form of powder, tablets, or capsules

Why is it used?

Amphetamine is used because it can make people happy, confident, feel energetic, and a loss in appetite, which can make overweight people lose weight. Many people also take amphetamine because it increases their sex drive.

Effects of taking the drug

Amphetamine effects everyone differently based on weight, health, whether the person is used to taking it, whether other drugs are taken around the same time, the amount taken, and the strength of the specific batch.


Short Term Effects

- Happiness and confidence

- Talking more and feeling energetic

- Repeating simple things like itching and scratching

- Large pupils and dry mouth

- Fast heartbeat and breathing

- Teeth grinding

- Excessive sweating

- increased sex drive


Long Term Effects

- Reduced appetite and extreme weight loss

- Restless sleep

- Dry mouth and dental problems

- Regular colds and flus

- Trouble concentrating

- Difficulty breathing

- Muscle stiffness

- Anxiety and paranoia

- Depression

- Heart and kidney problems

- Increased risk of stroke

- Needing to use more to get the same effect

- Dependence on amphetamines

- Financial, work, and social problems

Dangers of taking Amphetamine

Taking non prescribed and illegal amphetamines can be very dangerous and deadly. Taking a large amount or a strong batch can lead to an overdose.


Symptoms of an Overdose

- Racing heartbeat

- Fits

- Passing out

- Stroke

- Heart attack

- Death


Injecting amphetamines and then sharing needles can increase the risk of Hepatitis B and C, HIV/AIDS, and Tetanus.

Withdrawal

If you stop taking amphetamines completely, your body can't function. After taking the drug for so long, your body has become dependant on it to function correctly. Symptoms of withdrawal can lessen after a week and be mostly gone after a month.


Symptoms

- Cravings for amphetamines

- Increased appetite

- Confusion and irritability

- Aches and pains

- Exhaustion

- Restless sleep and nightmares

- Anxiety

- Depression

- Paranoia