Panther Nation Newsletter

September 24, 2021

A Message From our Principal

Panthers,

This week, my message to you all is from the District in regards to COVID Mitigation. Please read the statement below from the Woodland Park CoVid Response Team.

Until next time,

Mr. Burr



Dear WPHS Families,

As communicated, we continue to monitor the Scaled COVID-19 Response Mitigation Trigger data and want to update you on the mask/face covering requirements at WPHS. One of our main goals is to keep our schools open for in-person learning.

The number of confirmed positive COVID cases in the previous 14-days has reached the threshold triggering a 7-day mask/face covering requirement. In an effort to proactively respond to potential transmission, starting Monday, September 27, 2021, the District will implement mask/face covering requirements for all students, staff and visitors of WPHS, regardless of vaccination status. This requirement includes all indoor, WPHS events, and their participants, fans, and staff. The requirement will be in place for 7 days, through October 3rd, and re-evaluated as we continue to mo7nitor the data. Please remind your student(s) to bring a reusable mask starting Monday. Additionally, the school office will have disposable masks available for students should they forget, soil, or damage their mask.

Mask Guidance:

The following situations allow for the removal of a mask:

  1. While eating

  2. While outside during designated mask breaks or outdoor activities

  3. While staff are alone in their office or classroom with the door closed*

  4. While seated in an open office format to include cubicles, staff may remove their masks if seated and more than 12 feet away from their nearest colleague who also must be seated*

*If someone enters the room, you must put on a mask/face covering.

Thank you for your continued partnership as we strive to keep our schools open and our students and staff healthy and safe.


The Woodland Park COVID Response Team

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Cosner BY Uma Hahas

Chad Cosner has been working at Woodland Park for 3 years out of his total of 13 in this career. He recently made the change from counselor to Dean of Students. In his career, he has been a counselor, a drug and alcohol interventionist, as well as an athletics director. Mr.Cosner enjoys his new position, but will always miss and love being a counselor. Luckily this position holds less stress comparatively, Cosner’s perspective is as a counselor you deal more with your student’s mental health issues, you take your work home with you always wondering if you missed something, if you did enough? With this new position he deals more with behavioral issues and athletic director issues, there's always something to teach or to be learned with this position, making it less complicated as opposed to a counselor’s responsibilities. He has people around him easily available when he needs help in this new position, such as Ms.Lee and Ms.Gannon for example.

“I think the three most important things for what I do is to make sure that we're partnering with our community, building a positive culture in the high school, and that we're here to compete in everything we do- the 3-Cs.”


Of course, going into a new position has its struggles, one of the big ones for Cosner is time away from his family, not being able to see his kids like he used to. As the dean of students, you spend most of your nights overseeing school events and communicating with a large number of key stakeholders. He is trying to get his family to come along on these events and shifting what family time might look like going forward. Cosner is doing great in his new position and we appreciate the time he spends working with us. We look forward to seeing all the good things he can continue to do for the students of Woodland Park.


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SAVE THE DATES! Homecoming 2021 October 4-8

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Visit our Facebook and InstaGram page to learn more about our Director of Bands and Choirs, Mr. Jeff Hemingson

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WPHS Marching Band performs for the students at WPMS for Warm Welcome Wednesday

This morning, September 22nd, the WPHS Marching Band played at the Middle School for their Warm Welcome Wednesday! They welcomed everyone to school, and cheered everyone up with their pep band tunes. They did a fantastic job representing WPHS, and spreading their love for music throughout the district and community.

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Visit our Facebook and InstaGram pages to learn more about Mrs. Mauer, Coach of the Week

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Student Life- Driving Age BY Katie Larson

In the state of Colorado, the legal driving age is 16. The earliest you can get a permit is 15 years and 6 months old. You also need to complete a 30-hour driver’s education course or a 4-hour driver’s awareness course. In some states, such as Alaska and the Dakotas, the youngest you can get a driver’s permit is 14. In other states, 18 is the minimum age. 18 is also the age where Americans become a legal adult. 21 is the legal drinking and smoking age in Colorado and many other states. Why are these age requirements so far apart? Both activities can be dangerous to the person and the people around them.


A common argument for the age gap is that 16-year-olds cannot metabolize alcohol, but are physically capable of driving a car. But are they mentally capable of driving a car? Because of their inexperience, teenagers are faced with dangerous and stressful situations. However, an inexperienced 18 or 21 year old could face the same problems. To counter the lack of experience, many states have a certain amount of hours a driver must drive to be eligible for a driver’s license. This system is helpful, but not fail-safe as drivers could still crash during this time.


At 16, parents usually have more influence on their children’s lives. This gives parents an opportunity to teach driving skills to their teenagers. Behind-the-wheel practice is one of the most, if not the most, important factors in driving and reducing car crashes. Driving at a young age also teaches independence and responsibility. Teenagers grow up at some point and are released into the world with little to know knowledge about what lies ahead. By slowly introducing new problems, young adults will be more prepared. Overall, I believe that driving as a teenager has more benefits than disadvantages.

Health Screenings for the Freshmen class - all Freshmen have received a complimentary vision and hearing screening from our School Nurse. Please contact the Nurse if you have questions about these screenings.

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