Circulate!

Outreach, Engagement & Other Splendid Stuff

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It's the most wonderful time of the year -- time to celebrate books & libraries (what could be better?). The New York Times and Library Journal have lists of the best books of 2018, the I Love My Librarian awards have been chosen, and the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee has unanimously approved the Museum and Library Services Act, securing funding for the Institute of Museum and Library Services from 2019 through 2023.


This year, I'm celebrating the wonderful work done by our libraries, and by libraries across the country, and around the world. The Haskell Free Library and Opera House in Vermont gives all the feels as it uses its unique position straddling the border with Canada to reunite Iranian families separated by visa restrictions. Despite being threatened with forced closing by officials, the library continues to offer a space for families to visit, and reminding us that the work we do and the space we provide is for people to connect -- with information, experiences, knowledge and each other.

Library Moon Walk

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No, Jen, we're not trying to keep the Library Moon Walk quiet. We want the world -- nay, universe! -- to know that we're headed to the moon and beyond during the next five months. If you haven't yet logged your minutes, steps, or miles at Library Moon Walk, please do so today -- and spread the word!

Ask a Lawyer

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In partnership with the Western New York Library Resources Council (WNYLRC), the Capital District Library Council (CDLC) has retained the services of an attorney to offer CDLC and its members timely input on intellectual property, digital rights management, vendor contracts, first amendment, civil rights, employment law, and other legal issues that can impact library operations.

To preserve confidentiality, questions sent to CDLC's "Ask the Lawyer" service are sent directly to CDLC, WNYLRC, and our counsel for review and answers. Answers might come in the form of:


  • Public commentary shared with the member who inquired and become part of a Legal RAQ - "Recently Asked Questions" on the WNYLRC website;
  • A training session (in person or webinar);
  • A confidential memo shared only with the inquiring library and the CDLC and WNYLRC liaison.


Ask the Lawyer maintains Recently Asked Questions (RAQs), which are available here.
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In 2016, SALS began its Libraries Mean Business initiative to support small businesses and entrepreneurs. We do this by providing funding for Notary Publics in each SALS's library, creating turn-key programs for member libraries on a variety of business-related topics, and developing a digital collection of e-books and e-audiobooks.


If your library has not yet taken part in the Notary Public Training program, or if you would like to have a second person take the training, now is the time to register for the next round.


SALS will cover the cost of one person from each member library to:



In exchange, participating libraries MUST:


  • Let Erica know they intend to participate
  • Register with SUNY Adirondack & identify as part of the SALS group
  • Pay for the class, registration, and license
  • Submit paperwork to be reimbursed -- including documentation indicating completion of the SUNY Adirondack class.


The Notary Public License Exam Preparation—Face-to-Face classes are four hours long. The next in-person class will be from 12:30 -4:30 pm Thursday, December 6 at the Wilton Center. The price of the class is $65.


  • All materials will be provided, and information about how to link to NYS Department of State licensing information, booklets and forms will be distributed.
  • The Notary Public exam will not be given during this workshop. There will be an 80-question practice exam.
  • Participants will receive a certificate of completion at the end of the course. Submit this with the paid bills to SALS for reimbursement.

The Notary Public License Exam Preparation Course online, self-paced, notary course is offered from September 5 through December 12 using the Angel learning system.


The Notary Public exam will not be given during this workshop. Information about the exam schedule will be available in the class. Registration for this course closes on Wednesday, November 21. The cost is $75.


Please identify yourself as a SALS member when registering to obtain documentation of online course completion to submit with a copy of the paid bill to SALS for reimbursement.


To register and pay for the course call 518-743-2238, e-mail conted@sunyacc.edu, or complete and submit the registration form.


Please note that you must complete all required components of the course and submit your paid bill and the course participation documentation to receive reimbursement from SALS. The deadline for submitting documentation for reimbursement to Erica is December 31, 2018. No reimbursements will be made after that date.


Support for this program comes from the New York State Library’s Adult Literacy Library Services Program.

Sharing is Caring

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Share the awesome work you're doing with your colleagues at next year's New York Library Association conference in Saratoga Springs! Submit a program proposal by Monday, December 31, 2018.

Bibliotherapy

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What every librarian knows is now recognized more widely: Reading improves mental health. From curing loneliness to assuaging anxiety, books provide an escape, refuge, and solace while building empathy in a troubled world.

Learning on the Go

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Are apps for mobile phones the next frontier in adult literacy? The New York Office for New Americans invested in the Cell-Ed platform to help adult learners by removing the challenge of transportation and providing access to a flexible learning platform.

Write History

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The Library of Congress needs you -- to help transcribe Abraham Lincoln's letters, Clara Barton's diaries, and other historic documents. The transcription is the first part of a digitization plan that will make these documents searchable by keyword, bringing joy (and metadata!) to the heart of librarians throughout the land.

Opportunities Abound: Grants, Awards & More

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ALA and Dollar General Literacy Foundation invite public libraries to apply for grants to expand services for adult English language learners or adults in need of basic education and workforce development.


Up to 16 grants of $10,000 each will be awarded. Public libraries are eligible if they serve adult English language learners and are located within 20 miles of a Dollar General Store, distribution center or corporate office. Visit the Dollar General Store Locator to check eligibility.


Read the project guidelines and apply online by Dec. 14, 2018.


ALA will host a free webinar at 1 p.m. CDT on Wednesday, Oct. 24, for people interested in learning more about the American Dream grants. Register for the webinar here.


The American Dream Literacy Initiative strives to develop tools and resources for libraries and library staff to provide effective literacy services to adult English language learners in their communities and across the country.


The grants allow libraries to augment their print and digital English as a second language (ESL) collections; increase computer access and training; provide job training; hold English language learning (ELL), general educational development (GED) and citizenship classes; and raise the visibility of services for immigrant populations.


American Dream libraries build replicable programs, develop coalition-building strategies, and provide annotated lists of vetted resources for libraries across the country. ALA shares the libraries’ successes and strategies through the website, on webinars, and at state, regional and national conferences.


The American Dream Literacy Initiative is made possible through the generous support of the Dollar General Literacy Foundation. It is administered by ALA’s Public Programs Office and Office for Diversity, Literacy and Outreach Services.

Big Opportunities for Small Libraries

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IMLS has announced a new discretionary grant program, Accelerating Promising Practices for Small Libraries (APP). This is a special initiative of the National Leadership Grants for Libraries Program, and the goal is to support projects that strengthen the ability of small and rural libraries and archives to serve their communities. IMLS invites applications that focus on the following topics:


Three categories of APP grants are available to applicants:


  • Transforming School Library Practice: School libraries support learning and the development of critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration skills. IMLS is interested in furthering how school library professionals can serve as integral instructional partners to classroom teachers. Grant projects could include programs and services that prepare students for success in college, career, and life, or foster early, digital, information, health, financial, media, civic, and other types of literacies.
  • Community Memory: Libraries and archives not only serve as stewards of our nation’s knowledge and collections, but also as trusted spaces for community engagement and dialogue. This project category centers on engaging local communities in the collection, documentation, and preservation of their local histories, experiences, and identities. Proposals could include events and programs to digitize materials related to community histories, such as photographs, artifacts, or texts, or oral history projects that involve community members in the documentation and preservation of local histories.
  • Digital Inclusion: Libraries have an important role in promoting digital inclusion and increasing access to information, ideas, and networks. This category focuses on projects that support the role libraries play in promoting digital literacy, providing internet access, and enabling community engagement through civic data and civic technology. Grant proposals could include programs supporting broadband access and wireless networks to address the homework gap, increase small business development and entrepreneurship, or plan for emergency preparedness.

Cohort Learning and Evaluation
Grantees in this initiative will participate in communities of practice based on their project category. Three third-party mentor organizations will lead these cohorts, providing expert guidance and facilitating communication between grantees.


The deadline to submit an application is February 25, 2019.
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The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and Arts Midwest have opened the application process for the September 1, 2019 - June 30, 2020 NEA Big Read program. This grant program annually supports approximately 75 dynamic community reading programs, each designed around a single NEA Big Read selection. Organizations selected to participate in NEA Big Read receive a grant, access to online training resources and opportunities, digital resources, and promotional materials designed to support widespread community involvement.


NEA Big Read applicants submit proposals to host a series of community events presented at a variety of locations over the course of one month or longer. Events use the same NEA Big Read book as a point of departure and encourage participants to engage both with the book and fellow community members. Each NEA Big Read program includes: a kick-off event, often attended by high-profile leaders and other local luminaries; major events inspired by the content and themes from the book (e.g., panel discussions and author readings); artistic events related to the book (e.g., art/writing contests, film screenings, and theatrical performances); and book discussions in diverse locations involving a wide range of audiences.


Deadline: Thursday, January 24, 2019.

Learn All the Things!

Community Conversations Across Neighborhoods: Dialogue-Driven Programming

Wednesday, Dec. 5th, 1pm

This is an online event.

In February 2017, the New York Public Library (NYPL) launched a Community Conversations pilot with the goal of further establishing branch libraries as key civic convening centers, providing space, information and quality discussion for communities to better understand and problem-solve around local issues.


Aligning with the ALA Public Programs Office’s Libraries Transforming Communities initiative, NYPL’s Adult Programming and Outreach Services (ORS) Office developed an original 11-month training program with staff from 16 branch libraries that resulted in a series of unique, community-led programs.


Program boundaries were kept flexible enough for branch staff to be able to design programs with their own diverse neighborhood communities in mind. Branches experimented with a variety of tactics to ensure community focus, including community issue voting boards, a public planning committee, community-mapping and final program sessions that invited attendees to discuss next steps.


Participants of this session will learn:

  • Best practices and lessons learned from NYPL’s Community Conversations programming
  • How to launch successful location-based Community Conversations initiatives that build partnerships and engage staff in new ways
  • Specific dialogue-driven program models that can be used as templates for programs in libraries across geographic locations

From the Mountains to the Sea: Rural Health Issues and Resources

Tuesday, Dec. 11th, 2pm

This is an online event.

Evidence shows that there are marked health disparities between those living in rural areas versus their urban counterparts. Not only do rural residents suffer from a higher incidence of chronic illness, but they also have limited access to primary care services and are more likely to be uninsured or under-insured. This session will describe hallmarks of rural America, identify other access challenges of living in rural communities, and equip participants with tools to service the health information needs of those living in rural communities.


Objectives


  • Increase knowledge of the unique nature of rural communities, including their attributes and challenges
  • Identify health information needs specific to rural communities
  • Become familiar with resources to address the health information needs of rural citizens
  • Identify potential community partners in rural communities

Using USCIS Resources to Support Immigrants and Refugees in the Library

Tuesday, Dec. 11th, 3pm

This is an online event.

Is your library looking for ways to support immigrants and refugees in your community? Would you like to help people learn about United States citizenship? Are you interested in free, high-quality, and easy-to-use educational resources? The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services’ (USCIS) Office of Citizenship has developed a wealth of products and resources your library can use to help people gain information on how to become a U.S. citizen, prepare for the U.S. naturalization test and interview, as well as navigate life in the United States.


During this one-hour webinar, attendees will:


  • Learn about developing "Citizenship Corners" using USCIS materials
  • Receive information on free educational products and resources available through USCIS
  • Gain ideas on how libraries can help recently arrived immigrants and refugees

Join presenters Domminick McParland (USCIS) and Shawn Chakrabarti (USCIS) as they discuss a variety of free resources available through USCIS, while you develop ideas on ways your organization can utilize these resources to help immigrants and refugees in your community.


This webinar will be of interest to library staff and volunteers who want to help immigrants and refugees learn English, become U.S. citizens, or navigate life in the United States.

Library Programming for Adults, From Start to Finish

Tuesday, Dec. 18th, 3pm

This is an online event.

Adult programming at your library can bring the community together in meaningful ways but finding the ideal program and attracting the right audience can be overwhelming. This webinar will teach you to plan events and programs from start to finish, including identifying potential partners, getting community input, and successful marketing. Learn how to deliver quality, budget-friendly programs that will bring in the crowds without reinventing the wheel. From choosing dates and times to selecting events that get results, you’ll hear practical tips on everything it takes to launch adult programs your community will love.


Presented by: Cara Romeo, Assistant Library Director/Community Services Librarian, K. O. Lee Aberdeen Public Library (SD)

Implicit Bias in the Library Workplace

Tuesday, Jan. 15th 2019 at 3pm

This is an online event.

How do library administrators and managers foster a healthy, inclusive work environment so all employees can succeed? Unfortunately, individuals with diverse backgrounds and uniqueness are being subjected to subtle and overt bias in the library workplace due to the divisive climate in which we live. We have each been a part of the process; on either end of the bias whether we know it or not.


In this webinar, presenter Dr. Michele A. L. Villagran will share examples of implicit bias within the library workplace and discuss best practices for addressing and minimizing implicit bias in recruitment, hiring and retention. Attendees will have access to a reference list of articles and videos on implicit bias including ones the presenter has authored and instructions for taking a free implicit bias test.


At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:

  • Increase awareness of situations involving biases.
  • Identify different types of implicit bias challenges.
  • Develop an understanding of how to approach implicit biases.
  • Describe strategies and solutions to foster an inclusive work environment that may be applied within library workplace.
  • Apply best practices within library workplace to reduce implicit bias in recruiting, hiring and retention.

This webinar will be of interest to: Library administration, managers, staff, and human resource professionals who want to learn more about implicit bias to foster a healthy, inclusive work environment for all.

Stand Up for Health: Health and Wellness Services for Your Community for Public Libraries

Monday, Feb. 4th 2019 at 7:45am

This is an online event.

This 4-week 12 CE online course (from February 4 - March 3, 2019) is designed to provide public library staff with the foundation (or a refresher) of health and wellness reference, programming, and outreach for their communities. New content is released each Monday. Each week will involve some reading, discussions with your classmates, and a short (2-pages or less!) assignment.


This class is intended to be completed as a cohort that involves discussion with your fellow students. There are no set hours to be online each week, but it is important that you complete the discussion and assignment for each week in a timely fashion. New content will be released each Monday.


  • Week 1: Introduction to Consumer Health for Public Libraries
  • Week 2: Health Reference in a public library environment
  • Week 3 Health Resources
  • Week 4 Health and Wellness Programming and Outreach for Public Libraries


Participants will earn 12 Continuing Education Credits.


This class provides all five competence and all 12 CE credits needed for the Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) Level 1, a continuing education credit awarded by the Medical Library Association.