The ROCK Cycle Project

By: Alice Han (ROCKs ROCK!)

Breif Review of the Rock Cycle

Smash. Smash.
Melt. Melt.
Crash. Crack!
In the rock cycle, anything can happen. That little grain of rock you saw the other day at the beach in Florida? It's probably on its way to the volcano in Hawaii. You are wondering, how on Earth it could get there. Let's see, there's options. Carried in the water currents. Evaporated with the water. I mean, seriously, who knew?!

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The point is, the rock cycle happens... and who knows when it'll stop? It goes on an on and on... that sedimentary rock you picked up last week at the beach could have been an igneous or a metamorphic rock in its past adventures. Or it could have went through the same cycles of a sedimentary... weathered down. Compacted back together again. Here are some rocks below...

Introducing Our Little Stars!!

Some Other Pics of the Rocks Above!!!!!

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Quartzite's Cousins

Breccia's friends

And last but not least, Pumice's Relatives!!

SOURCES

"Quartzite." Quartzite. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2013.
"Quartzite." MEC. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2013
"Sedimentary Rock Examples." Examples of Common Sedimentary Rocks. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2013.
"Breccia." Is Very Similar to Conglomerate. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2013.
"BRECCIA." BRECCIA. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2013.
"Pumice: Igneous Rock." Geology.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2013.
"An Example of Igneous Rocks." An Example of Igneous Rocks. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2013

"The Rock - Pumice." PUMICE. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2013.