Etymology Project

Mitigate

Origin

The origins of the word mitigate are Late Middle English and Latin.

Definitions

Dictionary Definitions:

1. To lessen in force or intensity, as wrath, grief, harshness, or pain; moderate

2. To make less severe

3. To make milder or more gentle; mollify; appease

4. To become milder; lessen in severity


My Definition:

~To make something less harsh or severe

Other Forms

Prefixes:

~None


Suffixes:

~Ate-state or quality of


Parts of Speech:

~Mitigate-verb

~Mitigable-adjective

~Mitigatedly-adverb

~Mitigation-noun

~Mitigative-adjective

~Mitigator-noun


Roots:

~None

Synonyms

~relieve
~assuage
~tranquilize

Pronounciation

mit-i-geyt

Sentences

1. To mitigate the amount of homework we had, the teacher let us do it in class.


2. The mitigator had the rope so that the person wouldn't fall while rock climbing.

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Gauche

Origin

The origin of the word gauche is Germanic.

Definitions

Dictionary Definition:

1. Lacking social grace, sensitivity, or acuteness; awkward; crude; tactless


My Definition:

~Lacking manners or proper behavior; rude

Other Forms

Prefixes:

~None


Suffixes:

~None


Parts of Speech:

~Gauche-adjective

~Gauchely-adverb

~Gaucheness-noun


Roots:

~Noun

Synonyms

~bumbling
~insensitive
~uncultured

Pronounciation

gohsh

Sentences

1. The girl was gauche and didn't use any manners while at dinner.


2. He gauchely interrupted someone else who was talking.

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Ambivalent

Origin

The origin of the word ambivalent is unknown, but the first known use was circa 1910.

Definitions

Dictionary Definitions:

1. Having mixed feelings about someone or something; being able to choose between two courses of action

2. Of or relating to the coexistence within an individual of positive and negative feelings towards the same person, object, or action, simultaneously drawing him or her in opposite directions


My Definition:

~Having feelings toward something that are opposites of each other; having feelings that pull you in opposite directions

Other Forms

Prefixes:

~None


Suffixes:

~Ent-inclined


Parts of Speech:

~Ambivalent-adjective

~Ambivalently-adverb


Roots:

~None

Synonyms

~contradictory
~uncertain
~wavering

Pronounciation

am-biv-uh-luh nt

Sentences

1. She was morally ambivalent, and couldn't tell what the right thing to do was.


2. His ambivalence in the matter caused him a great deal of stress.

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Raucous

Origin

The origin of the word raucous is Latin.

Definitions

Dictionary Definitions:

1. Harsh; strident; grating

2. Rowdy; disorderly


My Definition:

~jarring; hoarse

Other Forms

Prefixes:

~None


Suffixes:

~Ous-possessing


Parts of Speech:

~Raucous-adjective

~Raucously-adverb

~Raucousness-noun


Roots:

~None

Synonyms

~gruff
~rasping
~unharmonious

Pronounciation

raw-kuh s

Sentences

1. The students were raucous during the pep rally.


2. His voice was raucous while he was screaming.