End of Course Exams

...they're just days away.

THE WRITING EXAM = MONDAY, APRIL 1st

THE EXPOSITORY ESSAY

  • only 26 lines to write on
  • purpose is to inform or explain
  • non-fiction writing
  • use a bubble map, plus/delta chart, venn diagram or rough outline to brainstorm
  • remember to never sit on the fence
  • has 3 body paragraphs (intro, body, conclusion)
  • you need a hook
  • must have a THESIS
  • includes a specific real world example


VERSUS THE LITERARY ESSAY


  • only 26 lines to write on
  • purpose is to entertain (you're writing a story after all)
  • fiction writing
  • use a plot triangle to brainstorm
  • you can write in 1st or 3rd person
  • ...you can have 3 paragraphs, or not-- I'll leave it up to you
  • must have believable characters and an interesting plot
  • use dialogue (make your characters talk)
  • you need a hook
  • remember to use figurative language!
  • you need a resolution


For the writing exam...

Students will have FOUR hours, yes just four hours, to...



  • write three essays
    - they will have to write one Expository, and one Literary Essay-- and then they will have to write one more (it could be either Expository OR Literary) that will be selected by the State and will be used as a Field Test, or in other words will not count towards their score.
    -It's so important that students finish all three essays, because there will be no indication which essay will be counted as the Field Test.
  • answer approximately 30-40 multiple choice questions
    -the questions will be about grammar and revision, and students will be given options to correct the phrase(s) in the question stem.




THE READING EXAM = TUESDAY, APRIL 2nd

MULTIPLE CHOICE:



  • approximately 70 multiple choice questions
  • over several reading selections
  • similar to the types of questions seen on tests throughout our school year
  • will be geared toward making inferences about the text
    -- as opposed to being merely comprehension



SHORT ANSWER RESPONSES


  • students only have 10 lines to write their responses
  • anything outside those lines will not be counted-- cannot double line
  • must include textual evidence (specific quote from the text) to support their claim
  • commentary is the most important part of the short answer-- can the student explain why their quote proves their claim?



In class we've been working on using the acronym "APE" to help remember the steps:

A = ANSWER (what's your answer or claim?)

P = PROOF (what proof from the text can you find to back up or support your idea?)

E = EXPLAIN (so what? why is this important, what does it prove, or what's the

significance?)


FOR THE READING EXAM...

Students will again only have four hours to...


  • read several "short" selections of text
  • answer multiple choice questions about each selection
  • write three short answer responses about the text selections

STUDENTS CAN USE A DICTIONARY & THESAURUS WHENEVER THEY WANT DURING THE TEST

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