The Guardian

College of Court Reporting, est. 1984

November 2021

CCR Steno Student, Jenny Dennis, attends her local court reporting convention.

What was your favorite part of the convention?


My favorite part of the convention was networking with the stenographers who were there. They were really encouraging and answered all of my questions. It was nice to hear from all the fields of stenography such as CART, official court reporters, and freelancers. I also enjoyed listening to Brittan Bolin, who is the Illinois state lobbyist for court reporters. She is fighting to keep court reporters in Illinois, and I found it inspiring to know just how important our job is!


Was there a specific tip or suggestion you learned in the educational sessions that you would like to share with your classmates?


My biggest setback has always been anxiety. I talked to a woman named Georgia Rollins, and she gave me some really good tips. One of the tips was to just pretend it’s you and the speaker. Focus on the words you hear and not on who is around you. For the emotional aspect, she said to practice a poker face. Watch puppy videos and funny videos and try not to laugh and just stay focused on what the words are instead of the content. I found that could work hand in hand with anxiety and emotions.


Did you meet anyone who inspired you? (I know Isiah:))


I really loved meeting Isiah Roberts. He was down to earth and really excited to share his story. Georgia Rollins was also inspiring to me. She did something called Boot Camp in Washington D.C. and talked about how it changed her as a court reporter. She said she laughed, she cried, she wanted to quit because it was so hard but, in the end, she said it made her a better reporter. There’s always room for improvement in every field and boot camp, for her, really motivated her to do more and also be an advocate for stenographers. Also, who doesn’t want to see a congressional meeting, and that’s one of the things she did in boot camp.


All in all, it was a great experience, and I can’t wait for next year. I would highly recommend attending your state conferences.

CCR Graduate, Keisha Jarrett, in court as a voice writer!

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Like to make Tik Toks?

CCR is looking for enrolled students and alumni to help make videos to promote the court reporting profession. Contact Nicky for the details, nicky.rodriquez@ccr.edu.

Free student webinars from NCRA. You do not need to be an NCRA member to join!

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Need a steno writing mentor?

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From the CCR archives...

FIRST IMPRESSIONS IN A SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD

By CCR instructor, Melissa Lee, CRI, CCR, A.S.


In life we are granted one first: our first step, our first day at school, our first kiss. Firsts are so important, in fact, it has been said that there is never a second chance to make a first impression. With that thought in mind, think about this: Potential employers often use Google and internet-based social websites to glean information about an applicant they are considering for employment. If a picture is worth a thousand words, what do the pictures on your social media accounts tell a future employer about you, and what kind of first impression will they be left with?


When you graduate, your transcript will not be the only thing you are selling. You, too, become a part of the product you are marketing. Your behavior represents not only yourself, but your future employer and your court reporting community as a whole. The activities you choose to participate in, your dress, and your appearance all become indicators to others of the person you are long before your work product is ever seen. In fact, most people will come to know about you before they personally know about you strictly based on a reputation that precedes you in a field where honesty, integrity, and discretion are paramount.


Understanding that your online image is the first impression of who you are is another important "first." People will determine if you are a person they want to work with from what they learn about you online. Start by guarding your name and your reputation the same way you would guard your Social Security number. Be mindful not only of the things you choose to post and say on social networking sites but the things you choose to allow yourself to be a part of or to participate in


With that said, remember that it is not always the picture you post on your Facebook or Instagram account that can have a detrimental effect on the impression you leave with others; it can be the picture you allow to be taken of you that is later tagged on someone else's social media account. Be mindful of the things you allow to be written on your wall. While you cannot control others and their opinions, you do have control over what is on your personal page and, presumably, what you post there reflects your opinions. While not always fair, some will judge guilty by association; so choose your associates wisely.


While an ounce of prevention may be worth a pound of cure regarding one's reputation and first impressions specifically, those who do have an embarrassing hiccup in their person histories should remember this: Do not allow yourself to be defined by your mistakes but, rather, by how you choose to overcome them, never forgetting your lessons learned today and applying them to all your tomorrows. Own your past and the mistakes it holds so they won't later own you. Be forthcoming regarding those errors in judgment so that you will never be presumed guilty of lying by omission.


While we strive for perfection, we will never be perfect. And while no firm is looking for perfection in an applicant, they are looking for someone who represents them, their values, and their company in a way they can be proud of and that they can sell to others. Begin this day becoming the reporter you want to market in your future. Develop a reputation that you can be proud of, and you will be showing others how much of an asset you will be to their team.

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The Veritext Court Reporting Student Scholarship Program

Veritext Court Reporting Scholarship

SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM DETAILS


ELIGIBILITY:

• Student must have at least a 2.5% GPA to qualify.

• Student must have successfully passed one test with a minimum speed of 100 wpm and above.


SCHOLARSHIP ELIGIBILITY:

Student must be enrolled in AAS Degree in Court Reporting or Certificate in Court Reporting, at the College Of Court Reporting


DETERMINATION:

Veritext Scholarship will be determined by the College of Court Reporting Program for one (1) annual $500 scholarship.


HOW TO APPLY:

Complete this application and return it to Mindi Billings at mindi.billings@ccr.edu.


DISBURSEMENT:

Scholarship awards can only be applied to tuition, supplies, and fees for courses taken at the College Of Court Reporting.

NCRA

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The National Court Reporters Foundation Student Intern Scholarship is now open for nominations. Two $1000 awards will be given to high-achieving court reporting students who have completed the internship portion of their education. Eligibility requirements include current NCRA student membership, speed test requirements, and a minimum 3.5 GPA. Applicants must be nominated by their court reporting programs and must also submit a letter of recommendation from an instructor or intern supervisor along with an essay. Judicial, CART, and captioning students are encouraged to apply. Please visit the NCRF Student Intern Scholarship page for full submission details.

Virginia Court Reporters Association

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NVRA

Applications are closed for 2021.

Although the applications are closed for 2021, keep an eye out for these scholarships from the National Verbatim Reporters Association to open for 2022.

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Job opportunities

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Reach out to Josephine Mitchell <jmitchell@quickcaption.com> for more information.
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Reach out to Judge Joel P. Fahnestock at Joel.Fahnestock@courts.mo.gov
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For more information...

Kate M. Martin, CCM

Clerk of Court/Court Administrator and

Pershing County Adult Drug Court Coordinator

11th Judicial District Court

P.O. Box H

400 Main Street

Lovelock, NV 89419

Direct Line: 775-273-5128

Phone: 775-273-2410 ext. 257

Cell: 775-223-9483

kmartin@11thjudicialdistrictcourt.net

CCR MISSION

The mission of the College of Court Reporting is to provide state-of-the-art instructional systems technologies and quality teaching techniques to educate students in the fields of realtime captioning and court reporting in an online environment. The College of Court Reporting is committed to providing a quality education to students that meet or exceed the standards of the national associations that represent and support court reporters, realtime writers, and related professions.
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Moving?

PLEASE NOTE: Should you move to another state, it's extremely important that you notify CCR of your new address and also learn your new state's licensing requirements by visiting www.ccr.edu>Resources>State Requirements.

If you have any questions, please contact Natalie Kijurna, Director of Alumni & Employer Relations/Title IX Coordinator, at natalie.kijurna@ccr.edu or 866-294-3974 ext. 229.