Cystic Fibrosis

Research

Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic Fibrosis a disease that effects lungs, pancreas, liver, nose, sinuses, reproductive organs, small intestine, and sweat glands. Dr Dorothy Anderson discovered Cystic Fibrosis. Exocrine glands produce thick mucus that builds up. This disorder is most common in white newborns 1 in 2,500-3,500. The disorder is autosomal recessive two copies of an abnormal gene (mutations in chromosome 7).

Symptoms, Treatment, and CFTC

Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis are: coughing, wheezing, respiratory illness, pneumonia, bronchitis. Medications that can help treat Cystic Fibrosis are Broncho-dilators and Pneumococcal Vaccine.Therapy for CF are inhaled antibiotics to kill bacteria, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy and chest physical therapy. There is a possibility of successful gene therapy by transfer of the normal gene to airway epithelial cells is being vigorously pursued.The protein produced by this gene normally helps salt (sodium chloride) move in and out of cells. If the protein doesn't work correctly, that movement is blocked and an abnormally thick sticky mucus is produced on the outside of the cell.The cells most seriously affected by this are the lung cells. This mucus clogs the airways in the lungs, and increases the risk of infection by bacteria.