Human Cloning

Should the cloning of humans be legal?

Cloning

Frogs were some of the first creatures to be cloned they were cloned in the 1950s.

In 1997 british scientists began to clone Dolly there were 277 eggs only 29 of those made it to be emryos and yet only one was born. Twenty-Eight embryos were destroyed and 276 eggs to make a single clone. After Dolly mice, pigs, goats, and rabbits were next. When Dolly was succesfully cloned several countrys were afraid humans would be cloned next so they ban the research of human cloning.

Pros

  • Clone extinct organisms
  • A pig with human properties
  • Docters could clone human skin
  • Clone Quality meat
  • Clones would not be copys

U.S. Ban

several countryd completly ban the research of human cloning. The U.S. only ban federal funds going toward researching human cloning, however many scientists continued to research human cloning with their own money

Cons

  • Dolly died hidden problems
  • more than 80% fail
  • Clones could be "property" or not have rights
  • Cloning of cells has failed to make cures
  • While researching embryos are destroyed
  • If there was a field of wheat tons would die

Should the cloning of humans be legal?

The bad in human cloning outways the good true it could be good but over 80% of clones fail plus thousands of human embryos are destroyed during research. When cloning a single human hundreds of embryos would die. Dolly also died early at the age of six from a disease so clones may have a higher chance of having diseases. clones also may not have normal rights or may be treated as property ina way bringing another form of slavery. they may even be used as transplants.

Bibliography

Works Cited

Brock, Dan W. "Research Cloning Is Ethical." Cloning. Ed. Jacqueline Langwith. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "Creating Embryos for Use in Stem Cell Research." Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics38.2 (Summer 2010): 229-237. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

"“CC” The First Cloned Cat." UPI Photo Collection. 2010. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2014.

"Cloning." Opposing Viewpoints Online Collection. Detroit: Gale, 2014. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

Cook, Michael. "Human Embryonic Stem Cell Cloning Has Failed to Yield Effective Cures." Human Genetics. Ed. Louise I. Gerdes. Farmington Hills, MI: Greenhaven Press, 2014. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "Not with a Bang but a Whimper."MercatorNet. 2013. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2014.

"Dolly, the first cloned mammal." Animal Rights. Kim Masters Evans. 2009 ed. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Information Plus Reference Series. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2014.

"First Ever Cloned Endangered Species Makes Public Debut." UPI Photo Collection. 2009. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2014.

Foley, Elizabeth Price. "The United States Should Not Ban Human Cloning." Cloning. Ed. Jacqueline Langwith. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "The Constitutional Implications of Human Cloning." Arizona Law Review43.2 (11 June 2011): 16-46. Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

Kass, Leon R. "The United States Should Ban Reproductive Cloning and Place a Moratorium on Research Cloning." Cloning. Ed. Jacqueline Langwith. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "Defending Life and Dignity: How, Finally, to Ban Human Cloning." The Weekly Standard 13.23 (25 Feb. 2008). Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

Saunders, William, David Prentice, and Michael Fragoso. "Research Cloning Is Not Ethical." Cloning. Ed. Jacqueline Langwith. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints. Rpt. from "False Promises: Common Cloning Claims Refuted." Family Research Council Brochure. Family Research Council, 2008.Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Web. 4 Dec. 2014