Baby Needs

What you need for your first year!

Baby clothing

One piece outfits (5 to 7)

Look for one piece outfits that zip or snap all the way down

Shirts (5 to 7)

Look for t- shirts with plenty of room around the neck so they come on easy

Leggings or pull on pants (5 to 7)

Long enough for the winter short enough for the summer.

socks and booties

comfortable form fitting socks and tight big enough fitting shoes.

pajamas/sleepers

Soft, breathable natural fabrics like cotton are comfy, and if they fit snugly they're a good alternative to synthetic, flame-resistant clothing (usually made of polyester). Avoid ribbons, strings, ties, and other decorative items that could get wrapped around your baby and pose a choking hazard

Diapering

Diapers: Whether you use cloth or disposable or something in between (some diapers use a reusable cover with a disposable lining), your baby probably will go through ten to 12 diapers a day at first, so plan accordingly. See our guide to diapering basics to decide exactly what you'll need.

Wipes: Whether you plan to buy wipes, make your own, or use a washcloth and warm water, you'll want to be prepared.

Changing pad or table: You don't have to buy an official changing table, but you'll probably want to have some designated place for diaper changes. Some parents use a changing pad or just a towel on the floor or bed. (Keep your hand on your baby at all times when changing on an elevated surface!)

Nursing/ feeding

Nursing/feeding pillow: Specially designed to support your baby while you're nursing or bottle-feeding, these can help you avoid straining your shoulders or neck during feeding sessions. They're more convenient – and better at keeping your baby in position – than regular pillows

Feeding

Highchair: You don't have to buy a freestanding highchair. A seat that hooks onto a counter or table, or a portable highchair that attaches to a regular chair, can work fine as well. But a full-size highchair with a tray can make cleanup easier, and rolling wheels allow you to move the chair from room to room (say, the dining room to the kitchen) without a fuss. Look a model that's easy to clean – you can count on food getting mushed into every crack

Bowls: Some parents like baby bowls with suction cups on the bottom – these stick to the tray and resist being flung to the floor

Baby spoons: A rubber-tipped or plastic spoon is easier on your baby's gums and small bibs

Bibs (3 to 5): Plenty of styles are available. Waterproof or quick-drying kinds are useful, as are bibs with a pocket at the bottom to catch falling food fit easily into a little mouth

Baby soothers,toys and entertainment

Pacifiers: Some babies love them, some don't. Pacifiers aren't a necessity by any means, but for some parents and babies, these soothers are an essential item.

Sleeping

Crib and mattress: Many new parents don't need a crib right away, choosing to use a bassinet or play yard with bassinet feature or bring their newborn into their bed instead. But you'll likely want to move your baby into a crib sometime in the first year, so it’s helpful to have it set up.

Bedding: Though you'll see plenty of fancy bedding sets in baby stores, all you really need are about three to five fitted crib sheets and perhaps a waterproof crib mattress pad. In fact, the bumpers, pillows, quilts, and soft blankets that often come with baby bedding sets shouldn't go in your baby's crib because they increase the risk of SIDS.

Wearable blankets (2 or 3): These fleece or cotton sacks zip over your baby's sleepwear and keep him warm at night. They replace traditional blankets, which aren't safe for sleeping babies because of the risk of SIDS. You may or may not need these, depending on the climate where you live and what season your baby's born in.

Swaddling blankets (3): Many newborns love to be swaddled, and having a few blankets made just for this purpose can make your life much easier. Note: Some wearable blankets are also made for swaddling, with flaps that fold over your baby's arms and secure with Velcro.

Safety

Safety

You'll need to watch out for the biggest household dangers for newborns and childproof your home as soon as your child is mobile – rolling, crawling, or creeping around.

A few pieces of safety equipment can help protect your baby from many common hazards.

Safety gates: If you have stairs, invest in safety gates for the top and bottom. You can also use a gate to block off areas of the house that might be perilous, such as the bathroom or your office. For more information, see our safety gate buying guide.

Outlet covers: Exposed outlets are an almost irresistible attraction to curious explorers. Bottom line: Keep them covered.

Cupboard and drawer latches: Choose from several types, including ones that latch or twist open and closed. Tug at them to make sure they can withstand numerous tries by a determined toddler

Toilet seat locks: Babies can drown in as little as 2 inches of water, so keep your baby and his toys out of the toilet with a lock. These fasten on top of a closed seat and require you to press a button or undo a latch to open them.

Baby monitors: These gadgets – which come with a transmitter and at least one receiver – allow you to keep tabs on your baby while you're in another room. The transmitter needs to be close enough to your baby's crib to pick up sounds (within 10 feet) but far enough away to ensure that the cord's out of reach if there is one. You can opt for a traditional audio model or a fancier (and more-expensive) video monitor that lets you see your baby. Get more information on buying a baby monitor.

Health

First-aid kit: See what to keep in your first-aid kit.

Bulb syringe: Use with saline drops to clear your baby's stuffy nose.

Teething toys: Chewing on these can ease your baby's discomfort during teething.

Digital thermometer: This is an important item to have in your medicine chest.

Baby nail scissors or clippers: These help you trim your baby's nails safely.

Baby-friendly laundry detergent: Some brands are specially formulated to be gentle on baby skin, although brands for sensitive skin are fine, too.

A soft-bristled baby brush: This is especially helpful for handling cradle cap.

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