The Sun

By Grant Holland

Core

The temperature is 7 million degrees F. The core contains 40 percent of the sun's mass in 10 percent of the volume. It is the hottest part of the sun.

Information source

fusedweb.gov

Picture

www.bestthinking.com

Radiative Zone

The Radiative zone is the section between the innermost core and the outer convective zone. In the radiative zone, energy generated by nuclear fusion in the core moves outward as electromagnetic radiation.

Source

www.windows2universe.org

Picture

sunstructures8.weebly.com

Convection

It extends from a depth of 200,000 km up to the visible surface of the Sun. Energy is transported by convection. The surface of the convection zone is where light is created.

Source

https://www.cora.nwra.com

Picture

solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov

Photosphere

Photosphere is the visible surface of the Sun that we are most familiar with. Since the Sun is a ball of gas, this is not a solid surface but is actually a layer about 100 km thick very thin.

Source

solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov

Picture

edicoespqp.blogs.sapo.pt

Chromospere

Layer above the photosphere where the temperature rises from 6000°C to about 20,000°C. This layer gives off a reddish color for the sun.

Source

solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov

Picture

en.wikipedia.org

Corona

Luminous irregular envelope of extremely hot and highly ionized gas located outside the chromosphere of the sun.

Source

www.thefreedictionary.com

Picture

frigg.physastro.mnsu.edu

Sunspots

Sunspots are darker, cooler areas on the surface of the sun in a region called the photosphere.

Source

www.space.com

Picture

m.teachastronomy.com

Prominence

A stream of incandescent gas projecting above the sun's chromosphere.

Source

www.dictionary.com

Picture

www.nasa.gov

Flare

Solar flare A sudden eruption of magnetic energy released on or near the surface of the sun, usually associated with sunspots and accompanied by bursts of electromagnetic radiation and particles.

Source

www.thefreedictionary.com

Picture

www.almanac.com

Aurora

Aurora lights are made by the collisions between electrically charged particles from the sun that enter the earth's atmosphere.

Source

www.northernlightscentre.ca

Picture

www.scienceworldreport.com

All the Layers www.nasa.gov-

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