Primary and Seconday Succession

A Timeline By Joshua Sweeney

Primary Succession

Primary Succession begins in a place without any soil. This "area without soil" can be created by landslides, flooding, or volcano's erupting. This leads us to the first stage of primary succession, which is lichens. They do not need soil to survive, (are called pioneer species) and they help break down the rock, alond with erosion, and turn the rock, very slowly, into soil. When the lichens die, they decompose, and turn into soil. This allows simple plants like mosses and ferns to grow. These limple lannts die, leaving enough soil for the second setage to start. The second stage would be wildflowers, grasses, and other plants start to take over. After a while, these plants will die, leaving even more soil. In the third stage, shrubs and trees start to pop up, making this area sustainable for insects, small birds, and mammals. when these trees and shrubs die, other shrubs and trees, sometimes even bigger than the last ones, slowly take their place. What was once bare rock now supports a variety of wildlife.

All of this information was from the video and slide at NetSchool.

Picture Link: http://kids.britannica.com/comptons/art-90129/Primary-succession-begins-in-barren-areas-such-as-the-bare

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Secondary Succession

Secondary succession would happen in a area that already has soil, unlike primary succession. This soil already had life in it, but it was wiped away by something; Ex: a forest fire. The first stage would the annual plants (flowers), perennial plants, and grasses. These aren't necessary poineer plants, because they werent the first plants there, but they are the first plants in this cycle. The second stage would mainly be shrubs.

Picture Link: http://kids.britannica.com/comptons/art-90130/Secondary-succession-takes-place-following-a-major-disturbance-such-as

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