Ecology Scavenger Hunt

By Ashley Benhayoun and Jessica Humen; P7; McDowell

1. Producer

Big image

Photo taken by Ashley Benhayoun; April 17, 2015; Coppell High School, Coppell, Texas

This picture of a purple flower with long stalks and leaves is an example of a producer. This flower is a producer because it is the first level of the food chain and it's green leaves enable it to make its own food with the energy from the sun through photosynthesis and the leaves and other parts will be eaten by consumers. The plant is autotroph which has the ability to create its own food which makes it a producer.

2. Primary Consumer

Big image

Photo taken by Ashley Benhayoun; April 17, 2015; Coppell High School, Coppell, Texas

This photo of a caterpillar represents a primary consumer. This caterpillar is a primary consumer because it is a living organism that eats the autotroph or producer in the food chain, which is the leaf of the flower.

3. Secondary Consumer

Big image

Photo taken by Jessica Humen; August 16, 2012; 9709 Cliffside Dr. Irving, Texas

This picture of a small bird represents the secondary consumer because it is the organism that feeds on the primary consumer, the caterpillar, in this particular food chain.

4. Tertiary Consumer

Big image

Photo taken by Jessica Humen; July 26, 2012; Dallas Zoo, 650 S R L Thornton Fwy, Dallas, TX 75203

This picture of a snake is an example of a tertiary consumer because it is the animal that specifically feeds on secondary consumers, which in this particular food chain, is a small bird.

5. Quaternary Consumer

Big image

Photo taken by Jessica Humen; July 26, 2012; Dallas Zoo, 650 S R L Thornton Fwy, Dallas, TX 75203

This photo of a Great Horned Owl is an example of a Quaternary consumer because it is the predator that eats the Tertiary consumer, which in this particular food chain, is a Great Horned Owl. Quaternary consumers are also carnivores, like the Great Horned Owl.

6. Decomposer

Big image

Photo taken by Ashley Benhayoun; April 17, 2015; Coppell High School, Coppell, Texas

This picture of a mushroom is an example of a decomposer because a mushroom is an organism that breaks down dead or decaying organisms, so it carries out the natural process of decomposition. Like a decomposer, the mushroom is also heterotrophic because it uses the organic materials to get energy and also use it for growth.

7. Mutualism

Big image

Photo taken by Ashley Benhayoun; April 17, 2015; Coppell High School, Coppell, Texas

The picture of students, Jessica Humen and Ashley Benhayoun hugging, is an example of the symbiotic relationship, Mutualism. Mutualism is a relationship in which both organisms involved are benefitted in some way. In this action, both Jessica and Ashley are benefited because they get to experience the emotions of friendship and love as they embrace into a hug.

8. Commensalism

Big image

Photo taken by Jessica Humen on September 5 2011 at 9709 Cliffside Dr Irving, TX

This picture of student, Jessica Humen, and her dog, Noel, shows the symbiotic relationship of commensalism which is when one organism benefits from the relationship while the other is unaffected. Because Noel is able to comfortably rest her paw on Jessica’s face, she is benefitting from this relationship while this neither benefits nor hurts Jessica so she is unaffected.

9. Parasitism

Big image

Photo taken by Ashley Benhayoun; April 17, 2015; Coppell High School, Coppell, Texas

This picture of student Jessica Humen happily stabbing helpless and hopeless student Ashley Benhayoun is an example of the symbiotic relationship, Parasitism. Parasitism is a relationship in which one organism benefits from the relationship but at the expense of the other. In this specific relationship, Jessica Humen is benefitting because she gets the satisfaction and happiness of slowly killing Ashley, an organism who she's hated for years. At the expense of the other, Ashley is not being benefitted because she is slowly being killed and this process is sucking all the life out of her.

10. Predator-Prey Relationship

11. Autotroph

Big image

Photo taken by Ashley Benhayoun; April 17, 2015; Coppell High School, Coppell, Texas

This picture of a tree is an example of an autotroph, an organism who produces its own food because the tree can make energy containing organic molecules from inorganic raw materials using a basic energy source. (photosynthesis)

12. Heterotroph

Big image

Photo taken by Ashley Benhayoun; December 25, 2014; The Benhayoun Residence, 1009 Roundrock circle, Coppell, Texas

The picture of Ashley Benhayoun posing with the Christmas meal she just made for her sick parents shows the types of organisms, heterotrophs. Just like humans, heterotrophs are dependent in complex organic substances for nutrients because they cannot synthesize their own food. In this picture, Ashley was dependent on cows, vegetables, and starches in order to obtain nutrients.

13. Uniform Dispersion

Big image

Famartin. Sagebrush-steppe along U.S. Route 93 in Central Elko County in Nevada. Digital image. Wikimedia Commons. Wikipedia, 4 July 2013. Web. 6 May 2015.

An example of uniform dispersion is the growth patterns of desert shrubs. In uniform dispersion, organisms are spread out in a regular pattern which occurs where individuals must compete for a limiting source. In this case, the desert shrubs compete for water.

14. Random DIspersion

Big image

Hume, Greg. TaraxacumOfficinaleSeed. Digital image. Wikimedia Commons. Wikipedia, 24 Apr. 2006. Web. 6 May 2015.

An example of random dispersion is of the growth of the plant in this picture, the dandelion. In the case of the dandelion, resources are distributed evenly or sporadically, but the dandelions grow in a random pattern due to the fact that their seeds are distributed by the wind.

15. Clumped dispersion

Big image

GalliasM. Spotted Hyena Cubs. Digital image. Wikimedia Commons. Wikipedia, 1 Mar. 2011. Web. 6 May 2015.

An example of clumped distributions is with hyenas that live in arid environments. Clumped distributions are found in places where resources are patchy, and mammals such as hyenas, who live in dry environments, have a clumped distribution due to the uneven distribution of water and water holes

16. Density Dependent Factor

17. Density Independent Factor

18. Competition

Big image

Photo Taken by Jessica Humen on November 4 2011 in Carrollton, TX

This picture of Jessica Humen’s cousins, Nicholas and Andrew, shows competition which is the interaction of two organisms where the fitness of one is lowered by the presence of another. Because Nicholas is larger and fighting his younger brother, Andrew, he is lowering the fitness of Andrew by inhabiting the same area as him at that moment. This also shows how they are competing for territory (their play room) and Nicholas is tiring out Andrew by competing.

19. Water Cycle

Big image

Photo taken by Elias Diaz on February 27, 2015 in Coppell, TX at Coppell High School

This picture of students, Jessica, Paloma, and Sneha, playing in the snow shows the part of the water cycle known as precipitation. Precipitation is when water in the clouds becomes so dense that the clouds can’t hold it any longer so they it is released back to the Earth in forms such as rain, hail, sleet, or in this case, snow. This shows the water cycle which is the process of water circulating through earth’s oceans, atmosphere, and land, because it shows the step of precipitation.

20. Carbon Cycle

Big image

Photo Taken By Jessica Humen on January 1 2015 at Victory Park in Dallas, TX

This picture of fireworks burning in the sky creating smoke shows the Carbon Cycle because the burning of the fireworks releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Burning is part of the carbon cycle which is why this picture shows the cycle of carbon and how it is released into the atmosphere and taken in by organisms and released again into the atmosphere in what is known as the Carbon Cycle.

21. Nitrogen Cycle

Big image

Zickos, Coco, and Arthur Keale. Kokee Carcass. Digital image. The Garden Island. The Garden Island, 10 May 2010. Web. 7 May 2015.

This picture of a decaying animal shows the part of the Nitrogen Cycle in which nitrogen is retained by the animal when it dies and is then released back into the soil as it is decomposed and converted into ammonium by detritivores which continues the cycle. The nitrogen is made usable by bacterium so it can be taken in by organisms and released back into the earth to restart the circulation of Nitrogen.

22. Phosphorus Cycle

Big image

Solum, Lawrence B. Rain on Rocks. Digital image. PBase. N.p., 21 June 2007. Web. 7 May 2015.

This picture of water raining on rocks shows the Phosphorus cycle because the rain causes phosphates from the rocks to travel down the runoff into bodies of water that are close, where they become solutes. This leads into the step in the phosphorus cycle where the solutes separate to form solid phosphates on the riverbed.

23. Secondary Succession

24. Biome

Big image

Holm, John. Alpine Tundra Copper Mountain Colorado. Digital image. Wikimedia Commons. Wikipedia, 30 June 2008. Web. 6 May 2015.

An example of a biome is a tundra, which is shown in the picture above. A biome is a major biotic community characterized by dominant forms of plant and animal life and prevailing climate. A tundra is a biome where tree growth is hindered by low temperatures and a short growing season. Here, there are shrubs, rodents, and elk that are surrounded by a cold climate.

25. Air Pollution

Big image

Collins, Nick. Exhaust Fumes Are Twice as Deadly as Roads, Study Claims. Digital image. The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group Limited, 18 Apr. 2012. Web. 7 May 2015.

This picture of the gas coming from car engines shows air pollution because the gasoline, which is from fossil fuels, used to fuel the car is turned into gas/smoke and released by the pipes on the bottom of the car into the air where it lingers in the atmosphere causing the air to become filthier and not as clean and fresh making it less breathable air.

26. Water Pollution

Big image

Photo Taken By JC Humen on May 7 2015 in Irving, TX

This pictures of student, Jessica Humen, seemingly pouring chemicals into a nearby pond shows water pollution because she is getting rid of chemical waste improperly by dumping it into the pond where it contaminates the water, kills the plant and animal life inhabiting that pond, and makes the water obtained from the pond for drinking more hazardous and harder to clean in order to make the water drinkable.

27. Greenhouse Effect

Big image

Nasa. Arctic Sea Ice Loss Animation. Digital image. Wikimedia Commons. Wikipedia, 2011. Web. 6 May 2015.

The Greenhouse effect is a process by which thermal radiation is absorbed by greenhouse gasses and re-radiated in all directions. The greenhouse effect causes climate change, and due to climate change, there has been a huge amount of arctic sea ice loss. The picture above shows the amount of ice in a particular area in 1980, which was much more than it is today. Now, Arctic ice is declining by 11.5% per decade.

28. Land Pollution

Big image

Photo Taken By John Humen on June 21 2013 at a beach in New Jersey

This picture of trash on the beach shows land pollution because napkins and plastic was littered on the beach which not only makes the beach look filthy, but is carried into the ocean by waves and can be ingested by aquatic life or even by seagulls or other animals that get to it before it is washed away. Because these things aren’t easily decomposed, it creates a mess and builds up waste and can cause areas to begin to look and smell like landfills making it an unsafe environment that inhibits regular and proper use of the beach and the environment.

29. Renewable resource

Big image

Pasricha, Neil. Come Sail Away. Digital image. 1000 Awesome Things. N.p., 4 Dec. 2014. Web. 7 May 2015.

This picture of the wind blowing plants shows a renewable resource because wind can replenish itself it a reasonably short period of time according to human’s consumption of it and compared to the average human life span. This allows for clean energy and for the wind to be used over and over again, theoretically never running out so humans can continue to use wind as a resource.

30. Non-renewable resource

Big image

Photo taken by Ashley Benhayoun; May 6, 2015; The Benhayoun Residence, 1009 Roundrock circle, Coppell, TX

The picture above shows a gas stove which uses a non-renewable resource. Like petroleum gas, non-renewable resources have a limited supply and take millions of years to refurbish. As a non-renewable source, petroleum gas cannot replenish its reserves fast enough to keep up with the population.

31. Cause of Extinction

Big image

NASA. Bolivia-Deforestation-EO. Digital image. Wikimedia Commons. Wikipedia, 16 Apr. 2001. Web. 6 May 2015.

A cause of extinction for species of animals all across the world, living in rainforests, is deforestation. In the process of deforestation, trees and vegetation are cleared in order to take advantage of the now bare land. The destruction of trees and the damage to the environment causes many species to lose their homes and lose their lives in the process. While trees fall down, creatures could get squashed or hurt. The loss of habitat for many species leads to their extinction.

32. Invasive species

Big image

Photo Taken By Jessica Humen on December 21 2014 in Manhattan, NY in Times Square

This picture of people shows an invasive species because they clear and develop certain areas where they are not originally from and move there which disrupts the environment of that area along with the entire ecosystem. The population of humans is unregulated because when they move, there are no natural predators and they take resources from almost every native organism already inhabiting that area which disrupts the ecosystem.


33. Algal Bloom

Photo Taken By Jessica Humen on September 21 2013 at 9709 CLiffside Dr Irving, TX

This picture of a pool filled with algae shows algal bloom because there is a buildup of algae on the pool which is not normally present. Algal bloom is when algae builds up and is concentrated into a specific area

34. Omnivore

Big image

Photo taken by Ashley Benhayoun; March 7, 2015; Rice University, Houston, Texas

As shown in the picture, an example of an omnivore is a squirrel. Like the squirrel, an omnivore is an organism that eats both plants and animals, and squirrels eat vegetation, bird's eggs, insects, and other things.

35. Herbivore

Big image

Photo Taken By Jessica Humen on February 7 2011 at 9709 Cliffside Dr Irving, TX

This picture of a hedgehog shows an omnivore because their bodies are adapted to consume and digest both plants and animals such as cucumbers and insects. They need to eat both in order to receive the proper nutrients they need.

36. Carnivore