Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

By Piper Koski

Transmission

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (R.M.S.F.) is a tick born disease. If you get bit by an American Dog Tick, Rocky Mountain Tick, or a Brown Dog Tick there is a possibility you have R.M.S.F. There are no signs of humans spreading the disease.

Symptoms

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (R.M.S.F.) has many symptoms. If you have a fever, chills, sever headache, muscle pain,nausea, vomiting, restlessness, insomnia, diarrhea, light sensitivity, hallucination, loss of appetite, thirst, and/or a rash, and you were bit by a tick there is a possibility you have R.M.S.F. Your symptoms should show up seven- fourteen days after you were bit.

Causes

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (R.M.S.F) is caused by ticks carrying infection. The infection is called Rickettsia Rickettsii. If an infected tick is attached to your body for 6-10 hours it can cause infection. Ticks are most active during the spring and summer. So, if you are outside or in a wooded area there is a chance a tick has landed on your body.
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Prevention

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (R.M.S.F) can be prevented. Wear long sleeves, pants and a hat in grassy/wooded areas. You should also put tick repellent on and tick proof your yard. After being outside you should check and make sure you don't have any ticks on your body and cloths. If you find a tick remove it right away.

Treatment

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (R.M.S.F) has a treatment. Doctors prescribe Doxycycline, which is the most affective way to treat R.M.S.F. If you are pregnant you might be prescribed Chloramphenicol instead of Doxycycline. If you get help from a doctor right after you are bit you can avoid the symptoms.

Location

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (R.M.S.F) originated in 1906 in the Rocky Mountains. H.T. Rickets discovered the disease. R.M.S.F. is found in most states in The Untied States of America except Connecticut, Kansans, Massachusetts, and Hawaii. It is also found in Mexico and Canada.

Statistics and Organs Effected

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (R.M.S.F.) had six out of every one million people getting R.M.S.F in 2010. There were 2,553 cases reported in 2008. R.M.S.F. effects the kidneys and the heart.
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Possible Complications

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (R.M.S.F) has some possible complications. Some of these complications are brain damage, clotting problems, heart failure, kidney failure, meningitis, pneumonia, and shock. These are all possible complications when you have R.M.S.F.

Other Diseases Like Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Besides Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever there are many other diseases contracted by ticks. They are Colorado Tick Fever, Heartland Virus, Lyme Disease, Poeassan Disease, Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis Disease, Aferican Tick Bite, Aneruptive fever, Southern Tick, Relapsing Fever, Babesiosis, and Tularemia. There are also many other diseases spread by ticks. Some of the symptoms these diseases have are headache, fever,and muscle pain. You should also go to the doctors to be sure you don't have any of these diseases.

Some of the ways you can prevent these diseases are wearing tick repellent. Long sleeves, pants and hats. Keeping away from wooded and bushy areas is also a way to prevent tick exposure. You should be careful in grassy areas. You should check for ticks after being outside for more than 3 hours. You should also tuck in your socks and wear light colors so it is easier to spot ticks.

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Conclusion

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (R.M.S.F.) is a tick born disease. There are many other diseases similar to R.M.S.F. There symptoms and treatments are a lot alike.

How to apply tick repellent safetly

  • don't apply to your face
  • wash repellent off at the end of the day
  • follow directions on the bottle
  • be careful applying it to kids

Bibliography

Works Cited

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 14 July 2014. Web. 8 Dec. 2014.

"Lyme Disease." History, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

"Other Tick Born Diseases." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 Feb. 2012. Web. 17 Dec. 2014.

"Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 21 Nov. 2013. Web. 3 Dec. 2014.

"Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic, 25 Sept. 2014. Web. 2 Dec. 2014.

"Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia." U.S National Library of Medicine. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Web. 4 Dec. 2014.

"Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (tick-borne Typhus Fever)." Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (tick-borne Typhus Fever). Web. 09 Dec. 2014.

"Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever." Britannica School.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2014. Web. 4 Dec. 2014. <http://school.eb.com/levels/high/article/64008>

Wood Ticks. Digital image. National Park Service. Web. 16 Dec. 2014.Donycycline Capsules. Digital image. Wikipedia. Web. 16 Dec. 2014.


How to Remove a Tick. Digital image. Arizona Department of Health Services. Web. 16 Dec. 2014.

Picture of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Digital image. MedicineNet.com. Web. 16 Dec. 2014.

Prevention. Digital image. Arizona Department of Health Services. Web. 16 Dec. 2014.

Satatistics. Digital image. CDC. Web. 16 Dec. 2014.