Chemistry at BCSS

Starring ...Oxygen and Magnesium.... OMg !

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Follow the progress of Mrs. Guglick's Chemistry Unit!

Welcome to the Chemistry Smore! Here you will find, information, pictures, and videos to help you learn and understand! Enjoy!

Classification of Matter

Element = Pure substance that cannot be broken down into any simpler substance by

chemical means. (Found on the PERIODIC TABLE)

Compound = Pure substance that is made from 2 or more elements that are chemically

combined. (Carbon Dioxide, Water, Carbon Monoxide, Salt NaCl)

Heterogeneous Mixture = Mechanical Mixture or Suspension (Cereal, Stew)

Homogeneous Mixture = Solution (Kool-aid, Coffee)

Physical Property

A characteristic of a substance that can be observed or measured.


Three physical properties of the beach glass below:

Lusture (shiny) Colour (red, green, blue) Transparency (how see through it is)

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Chemical Properties

Describes the ability of a substance to change into a new substance or substances.

Chemical properties includes how a substance INTERACTS with other substances.

Eg. Acids, water, heat, combustibility

Physical and Chemical Change

Physical Change: Changes affecting the form of a substance, but not its composition.

(cutting paper, grating cheese, melting ice, chopping wood)


Chemical Change: a change in matter that results in the formation of a new substance(s).

(cooking an egg, burning wood, metal rusting, copper oxidizing)

Chemical Reactions - BIll Nye The Science Guy

Atomic Theory

1. All matter is made of small, indivisible particles called atoms.

2. All the atoms of an element are identical in properties such as size and mass.

3. Atoms of different elements have different properties.

4. Atoms of different elements can combine in specific ways to form new substances.

SLOW "The NEW Periodic Table Song (In Order)" (AsapSCIENCE 2013)

Sub-Atomic Particles

All elements are composed of atoms, and one atom is the smallest unit of any element.


Protons - Positive charge - found in the nucleus

Neutrons - No charge - found in the nucleus

Electrons - Negative charge - found in energy levels surrounding the nucleus

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Bohr - Rutherford Diagrams

How to Draw Bohr-Rutherford Diagrams - Potassium

Atomic Theory

1. All matter is made of small, indivisible particles called atoms

2. All the atoms of an element are identical in properties such as size and mass

3. Atoms of different elements have different properties.

4. Atoms of different elements can combine in specific was to form new substances.

J.J Thompson

He experimented with electric currents in glass tubes called cathode ray tubes. Found the electron. His model of the atom was a positive sphere with negative electrons scattered throughout it.
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Ernest Rutherford - Gold Foil Experiment

Rutherford conducted an experiment in which he shot positively charged particles at a very thin foil of pure gold. Based on his experiment he discovered the nucleus.

He calculated that the size of the nucleus compared to the rest of the atom was like the size of a single green pea compared to an entire football field!

Niels Bohr - Electron Energy Levels

Bohr studied the properties of electrons in atoms and helped to transform Rutherford's model into one of the models that is used today.

He suggested that electrons surround the nucleus in specific energy levels, called shells.

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Elements on the Periodic table

Metals

1. Most of the elements on the periodic table are METALS.

2. Excellent conductors of electricity and heat.

3. Most are shiny and a silver or grey colour.


Non-Metals

1. Grouped together mostly because they do not resemble metals.

2. Not good conductors of electricity/ heat.


Metalloids

1. Have metallic and non-metallic properties.

2. Are generally 'semi-conductors' (conduct some electricity, but not very well)

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Families of the Periodic Table

PLEASE REVIEW YOUR NOTES for the characteristics of each family.
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Trends of the Periodic Table

1. Number of valence electrons for each group.

2. Number of electron shells

3. Valence number (+1, +2, +3, +/-4, -3, -2, -1)

4. Reactivity (Group 1 is HIGHLY reactive, Nobel Gases are un-reactive)