Bruce Peninsula

national park

Activetes to do.

Camping, Bruce Peninsula National Park offers superb semi-wilderness camping, in ideal locations to base your park adventure. Four different camping experiences are available in the park:Drive-in sites at the Cyprus Lake Campground Group camping at Cyprus Lake Backcountry camping along the Bruce Trail at Stormhaven or High Dump Yurt camping along the shore of Cyprus Lake Camping in the park is popular during summer, so reservations are strongly recommended. Spring and fall are superb times to visit, with fewer people, and natural attractions including wildflowers (spring), bird migration and fall colours.
Bruce Peninsula National Park, The Grotto, August 2010

swimming

There are many excellent opportunities for photography within Bruce Peninsula National Park. The magnificent landscape and unique diversity of plant and animal species attract wildlife photographers from around the world.

Please observe the rules of "no trace photography" which we enforce within the national park.

Swimming


Swimming at Cyprus Lake
© Parks Canada/ PB Collection

Good but unsupervised swimming is available in several locations. Cyprus Lake has a shallow beach. A 30-minute walk from the Head-of-Trails parking lot gets you to Indian Head Cove and the Grotto. This intricately carved rocky shoreline is very popular with swimmers who like cold, deep water. There are acres of shallow sandy shoreline at Singing Sands Beach at Dorcas Bay on Lake Huron.


Hiking

Self-guided Trails


Aerial of Cyprus Lake and Horse Lake
© Parks Canada/ PB Collection

Cyprus Lake Trail

5km, 2.5 hours, low difficulty

For the less rugged experience, follow this trail around Cyprus Lake. A watchful eye will note the charred stumps from forest fires of the early 1900s. There are many access trails from the Cyprus campground and campers are encouraged to use this trail as their path to the Head-of-Trails.


Natural Arch
© Parks Canada/ PB Collection

Georgian Bay - Marr Lake Trail

3km, 3.0 hours, difficulty varies

The Georgian Bay Trail is the easiest and quickest path to the

Self-guided Trails


Aerial of Cyprus Lake and Horse Lake
© Parks Canada/ PB Collection

Cyprus Lake Trail

5km, 2.5 hours, low difficulty

For the less rugged experience, follow this trail around Cyprus Lake. A watchful eye will note the charred stumps from forest fires of the early 1900s. There are many access trails from the Cyprus campground and campers are encouraged to use this trail as their path to the Head-of-Trails.


Natural Arch
© Parks Canada/ PB Collection

Georgian Bay - Marr Lake Trail

3km, 3.0 hours, difficulty varies

The Georgian Bay Trail is the easiest and quickest path to the park's scenic cliffs and shore. At the shoreline this trail meets the Bruce Trail, giving the option of two different routes.

Halfway Rock Point offers an excellent vista: on the northern horizon lie Flowerpot and Bear's Rump islands in Fathom Five National Marine Park. From here the trail enters Indian Head Cove, favoured by both swimmers and SCUBA divers. West of this cove are two sea caves, the Natural Arch, and further along, the Grotto.

These caves were carved from the rock face by centuries of waves beating on the porous dolomite of the cliffs. At least two underwater entrances lead into the Grotto from the Bay.

The return route via Marr Lake is identified by signs on the cobble beach west of Indian Head Cove. Be careful. This route is rough as it crosses the rubble along the shore between the Grotto and Marr Lake.


Georgian Bay Shoreline
© Parks Canada/ PB Collection

Horse Lake Trail

1km, 0.5 hours, moderate difficulty

This trail skirts the eastern side of Horse Lake and wanders through a great diversity of habitats (i.e. marsh, lake edge, woodland shoreline). The trail ends at a boulder beach on Georgian Bay. Here the options are to return the same way or continue along the shore in either direction on the Bruce Trail.



Canoeing/Kayaking


Motorboats are prohibited on Cyprus Lake. Non-powered craft such as canoes and sailboards may be used on the lake anytime.

Canoeing gives our visitors a unique perspective on our park. Most of the Bruce Peninsula National Park's inland lakes can easily be explored in day trips.

Cyprus Lake is easily accessible to paddlers, and a navigable stream leads through to the larger Cameron Lake. Keep an eye open for great blue herons and kingfishers.

Emmett Lake has many bays to discover. Take the right fork on Emmett Lake Road. It leads right to Emmett's shore, where there is easy access to the lake, although parking is limited.




Bruce Peninsula National Park


The Bruce Peninsula National Park is situated on the northern tip of the Bruce Peninsula, between Georgian Bay andLake Huron. The beautiful park, with a size of 155 square kilometers at the tip of the Niagara Escarpment, consists out of limestone cliffs, caves and underground streams, and ancient forests with some of the oldest trees in Canada. The Bruce Peninsula National Park is comprised of an incredible array of habitats from rare alvars to dense forests and clean lakes. Together these form a greater ecosystem - the largest remaining chunk of natural habitat in southern Ontario.



History of the Bruce Peninsula National Park

In 1987 the Park came into existence. The federal and provincial governments established an agreement – which was not greeted with open arms by some of the residents in the Northern Bruce Peninsula. Today – both local residents and visitors have increasingly embraced the park. A park survey of Bruce County residents found, for example, that 73% of respondents felt that the most important role of the park was protecting the natural environment. Sixty percent of the local residents surveyed had visited the park in the previous year. Meanwhile, it is estimated that close to 10 million people now live within a four-hour drive of the park.
The final park boundaries encompass an area of approximately 156 square kilometers, with significant private land holdings within these boundaries (covering about one-fifth of the park’s area).
As a park established within a settled 20 years after its establishment,Bruce Peninsula National Park is still a work in progress.



knowledge

Location: Ontario


landform region: great lakes

climate: warm or cold

vegetation: The Bruce Peninsula National Park contains open grasslands, sand dune scrub land, mixed-wood forests and wetlands. It is very diverse because it contains 34 species of orchrids, 32 species of ferns. The Bruce Peninsula National Park has some of the oldest trees, and many tree types like eastern white cedar, spruce, fir, birch, poplar, maple, and beech.

landforms: mountains, cool shaped rocks, caves,