Oxycodone

Connor Tsolis and Quinn Reardon

Oxycodone

Oxycontin is a very strong opiate. It's essentially the same as heroin, and since many of the people who abuse it chop it up and snort it, or even shoot it up, there is no difference between being addicted to Oxycontin and being addicted to heroin.

Street names

  • Cotton, Pills, Kickers, Oxy, Cotton, Beans, Rushbo

Affects

  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Addiction
  • Unconsciousness
  • Respiratory depression
  • Increased risk of heart attack
  • Coma
  • Death

Statistics

Oxycontin is an opiate drug prescribed for pain relief. It is powerful and effective, and it can be beneficial if used correctly. The difference between Oxycontin and other opiate pain management tools is the way it delivers the medicine into the body as well as the strength of the medication. A person that has been using opiates can take a dose that would kill a person who was new to the drug.

Advice

  • Don't start, these are the effects -
  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • bloating or swelling of the face, arms, hands, lower legs, or feet
  • blood in the urine
  • burning while urinating burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles", or tingling feelings
  • chest pain
  • convulsions
  • cough
  • decrease in the frequency of urination

Questions from original handout -

Q: Whats the difference between legal medicine and illegal drugs?

A: The difference between legal and illegal drugs is how you use them. Most drugs that we consider illegal today were once used as everyday medicine. The constant abuse of these medicines like heroin and methamphetamine resulted in their outlawing. In 1970 Methamphetamine became illegal. In 1924 heroin also became illegal. Once used for daily treatment for aches and pains, heroin was outlawed.


Q: What should I do if someone offers me drugs? How can I deal with the peer pressure?

A: If someone offers you drugs, just say no. Their opinion should a result for your possible death.