12th Amendment.

By Olalekan Lawal

12th Amendment

an amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified in 1804, providing for election of the president and vice president by the electoral college: should there be no majority vote for one person, the House of Representatives (one vote per state)chooses the president and the Senate the vice president.

Court case: Bush V. Gore

In Bush v. Gore (2000), a divided Supreme Court ruled that the state of Florida's court-ordered manual recount of vote ballots in the 2000 presidential election was unconstitutional. The case proved to be the climax of the contentious presidential race between Vice President Al Gore and Texas Governor George W. Bush. The outcome of the election hinged on Florida, where Governor Bush led Vice President Gore by about 1,800 votes the morning after Election Day. Because the returns were so close, Florida law called for an automatic machine recount of ballots. The recount resulted in a dramatic tightening of the race, leaving Bush with a bare 327-vote lead out of almost 6 million ballots cast. With the race so close, Florida law allowed Gore the option of "manual vote recounts" in the counties of his choosing. Gore opted for manual recounts in four counties with widespread complaints of voting machine malfunction: Broward, Miami-Dade, Volusia, and Palm Beach. However, Florida law also required that the state's election results be certified by the Secretary of State, Katherine Harris, within seven days of the election (by November 14, 2000). Three of the four counties, frantically laboring through the tedious manual recount, were unable to complete the process by the deadline.

Lawal V. Mclain

JCMS Presidental Election

In Lawal v. McClain (2014), a divided School Court ruled that the District of Mansfield's court-ordered manual recount of vote ballots in the 2014 presidential election was unconstitutional. The case proved to be the climax of the contentious presidential race between Vice President McClain and Texas President Olalekan Lawal . The outcome of the election hinged on Mrs. Rodgers class, where President Olalekan Lawal led Vice President McClain by about 1,800 votes the morning after Election Day. Because the returns were so close, Jcms law called for an automatic machine recount of ballots. The recount resulted in a dramatic tightening of the race, leaving Lawal with a bare 327-vote lead out of almost 1,389 ballots cast. With the race so close, Mrs. Rodgers law allowed McClain the option of "manual vote recounts" in the counties of his choosing. McClain opted for manual recounts in four counties with widespread complaints of voting machine malfunction: Mr.Broward, Mrs.Dade, .Mrs.Volusia, and Coach Palm . However, Texas law of State, Katherine Harris, within seven days of the election (by November 14, 2014). Three of the four counties, frantically laboring through the tedious manual recount, were unable to complete the process by the deadline.