Survival guide for a healthy life

Heart disease and Cancer

How do you define Heart disease and Cancer

  • Heart disease: Conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain (angina) or stroke.



  • Cancer: The disease caused by an uncontrolled division of abnormal cells in a part of the body.

How can one protect themselves from cancer and Heart diseases

  • Cancer
  1. Make sure to eat up your greens every night at dinner
  2. Instead of those refined grains, start eating up the whole grains
  3. make sure to get your running shoes and walk at least 5 times a week
  4. Finally make sure you're hydrated by drinking plenty of water everyday
  • Heart Diseases
  1. Stay away from the deathly stick of smoke
  2. exercise is very important for heart health
  3. stay away from illegal drugs
  4. Finally eat a healthy meal everyday

What is one thing I can eat to keep myself happy


    Broiled White sea bass


    2 white sea bass fillets, each 4 ounces
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 teaspoon garlic, minced
    1/4 teaspoon salt-free herbed seasoning blend
    Ground black pepper, to taste

Directions

Preheat the broiler (grill). Position the rack 4 inches from the heat source.

Lightly spray a baking pan with cooking spray. Place the fillets in the pan. Sprinkle the lemon juice, garlic, herbed seasoning and pepper over the fillets.

Broil (grill) until the fish is opaque throughout when tested with a tip of a knife, about 8 to 10 minutes. Serve immediately.

Nutritional analysis per serving

Serving size :1 fillet

  • Total fat 2 g
  • Calories 114
  • Protein 21 g
  • Cholesterol 46 mg
  • Total carbohydrate 2 g
  • Dietary fiber 1 g
  • Monounsaturated fat < 1 g
  • Saturated fat 1 g
  • Sodium 78 mg

Doctors order about cancer

How I fought my diagnosis

"I was diagnosed with brain cancer about 16 years ago. I received chemotherapy and went into remission, but the cancer came back and I endured two surgeries and 13 months of chemotherapy. I asked my oncologist if I ought to change my diet to avoid another recurrence. His answer was perfectly stereotypical: "Eat what you like. It won't make much difference."He was wrong.The extensive research published in the last decade alone proves that what you eat can have a profound effect on your protection against cancer. But my doctor's answer was hardly surprising. It's a little-known fact that nutrition is barely taught in med schools, where the solution to most problems is a drug. And doctors don't trust patients to make lifestyle changes. I recall a conversation with a fellow physician at a conference after I spoke on the importance of a healthy diet in fighting disease. "You may be right, David, but people don't want to change," he said. "They just want to take a pill and forget about it." I don't know whether he's right, but after all the study I've done, I know it isn't true for me."---David Servan-Schreiber, MD, PhD.

Doctors order about Heart disease

"Heart disease may be a leading cause of death, but that doesn't mean you have to accept it as your fate. Although you lack the power to change some risk factors — such as family history, sex or age — there are some key heart disease prevention steps you can take.

You can avoid heart problems in the future by adopting a healthy lifestyle today. Here are six heart disease prevention tips to get you started.


1. Don't smoke or use tobacco


Smoking or using tobacco of any kind is one of the most significant risk factors for developing heart disease. Chemicals in tobacco can damage your heart and blood vessels, leading to narrowing of the arteries (atherosclerosis). Atherosclerosis can ultimately lead to a heart attack.

Carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke replaces some of the oxygen in your blood. This increases your blood pressure and heart rate by forcing your heart to work harder to supply enough oxygen. Women who smoke and take birth control pills are at greater risk of having a heart attack or stroke than are those who don't do either because both smoking and taking birth control pills increase the risk of blood clots.

When it comes to heart disease prevention, no amount of smoking is safe. But, the more you smoke, the greater your risk. Smokeless tobacco and low-tar and low-nicotine cigarettes also are risky, as is exposure to secondhand smoke. Even so-called "social smoking" — smoking only while at a bar or restaurant with friends — is dangerous and increases the risk of heart disease.

The good news, though, is that when you quit smoking, your risk of heart disease drops almost to that of a nonsmoker in about five years. And no matter how long or how much you smoked, you'll start reaping rewards as soon as you quit.


2. Exercise for 30 minutes on most days of the week


Getting some regular, daily exercise can reduce your risk of fatal heart disease. And when you combine physical activity with other lifestyle measures, such as maintaining a healthy weight, the payoff is even greater.

Physical activity helps you control your weight and can reduce your chances of developing other conditions that may put a strain on your heart, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Try getting at least 30 to 60 minutes of moderately intense physical activity most days of the week. However, even shorter amounts of exercise offer heart benefits, so if you can't meet those guidelines, don't give up. You can even get the same health benefits if you break up your workout time into three 10-minute sessions most days of the week.

And remember that activities, such as gardening, housekeeping, taking the stairs and walking the dog all count toward your total. You don't have to exercise strenuously to achieve benefits, but you can see bigger benefits by increasing the intensity, duration and frequency of your workouts.


3. Eat a heart-healthy diet


Eating a healthy diet can reduce your risk of heart disease. Two examples of heart-healthy food plans include the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan and the Mediterranean diet.

A diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains can help protect your heart. Beans, other low-fat sources of protein and certain types of fish also can reduce your risk of heart disease.

Limiting certain fats you eat also is important. Of the types of fat — saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated and trans fat — saturated fat and trans fat are the ones to try to limit or avoid. Try to keep saturated fat to no more than 10 percent of your daily calories. And, try to keep trans fat out of your diet altogether.

Major sources of saturated fat include:

  • Red meat
  • Dairy products
  • Coconut and palm oils

Sources of trans fat include:

  • Deep-fried fast foods
  • Bakery products
  • Packaged snack foods
  • Margarines
  • Crackers

If the nutrition label has the term "partially hydrogenated," it means that product contains trans fat.

Heart-healthy eating isn't all about cutting back, though. Healthy fats from plant-based sources, such as avocado, nuts, olives and olive oil, help your heart by lowering the bad type of cholesterol.

Most people need to add more fruits and vegetables to their diet — with a goal of five to 10 servings a day. Eating that many fruits and vegetables can not only help prevent heart disease but also may help prevent cancer and improve diabetes.

Eating several servings a week of certain fish, such as salmon and mackerel, may decrease your risk of heart attack.

Following a heart-healthy diet also means keeping an eye on how much alcohol you drink. If you choose to drink alcohol, it's better for your heart to do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. At that moderate level, alcohol can have a protective effect on your heart. More than that becomes a health hazard."------ Mayo clinic Staff

Work Cited

Staff, Mayo Clinic. "Heart Disease." Prevention: Strategies Keep Your Heart Healthy. Mayo Clinic Staff, Apr.-May 08. Web. 10 Dec. 2014. It provided information on how to prevent Heart disease



Sheinber, David S. "Edible Healing: Food Cures For Cancer." Prevention. David, July-Aug. 2012. Web. 11 Dec. 2014.



Johson, Charlotte H. "Broiled White Sea Bass." Recipe. Charlotte, 30 Sept. 2011. Web. 11 Dec. 2014.