Carpet Maker

The Canterbury Tales

The Carpet Maker

- He is a carpet maker.

- The need for this occupation in this time period was quite a bit because the kings and nobles wanted the best and fanciest carpets and they needed the best carpet makers to do so.

- His social standing was around middle class, because he was a hard worker for the kings and nobles. He worked under or for the upperclassmen.

Describing the Carpet Maker

Lines 375-380: "They were so trim and fresh their gear would pass for new. Their knives were not tricked out with brass but wrought with purest silver, which avouches a like display on girdles and on pouches. Each seemed a worthy burgess, fit to grace a guild-hall with a seat upon the dais."


Line 373-334: "Among our ranks, all in the livery of one impressive guild-fraternity"

These lines describe how he is apart of an association of men that practice the same craft or trade and they set the standards for workmanship and they protect their members by controlling competition. He is a very hard worker and also very competitive.

Analysis of the passage -

Chaucer thinks that the carpet maker in the story is one of the best of the best in the business. He thinks that he has the finest tools and equipment.


Lines 375-380 tell you that Chaucer thinks this. These lines say that " "They were so trim and fresh their gear would pass for new. Their knives were not tricked out with brass but wrought with purest silver, which avouches a like display on girdles and on pouches. Each seemed a worthy burgess, fit to grace a guild-hall with a seat upon the dais."


Words like "they were so trim and fresh" and "each seemed a worthy burgess" helps to show and understand the vocabulary from that time period.

Cites -

Selections from the Canterbury Tales. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1964. Print